Invalidated Trademarks may Still Cause Your Products to be Seized by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, but There’s a Solution.

Among its other duties, U.S. Customs and Border Protection ("CBP") has the daunting task and responsibility to search and seize products that are counterfeit or otherwise infringe the intellectual property rights of original goods manufacturers. This is accomplished through CBP's Intellectual Property Rights Recordation System.

By |2022-07-06T13:31:50-04:00October 19, 2011|Import, Seizures|Comments Off on Invalidated Trademarks may Still Cause Your Products to be Seized by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, but There’s a Solution.

Recovering Your Seized Cargo from U.S. Customs

On September 8, 2011, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. EST, the Journal of Commerce will host a webinar entitled "Recovering Your Seized Cargo". The speakers will be Dennis McKenzie, Director, Fines, Penalties, and Forfeitures Division, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Washington, D.C., and Peter Quinter, Partner in Charge, Customs and International Trade Department, Becker & Poliakoff law firm. The panel experts will explain the CBP detention and seizure process, as well as the administrative petition and judicial forfeiture process.

By |2011-08-22T12:33:56-04:00August 22, 2011|Seizures|Comments Off on Recovering Your Seized Cargo from U.S. Customs

Notice of Detention of Merchandise by U.S. Customs and Border Protection

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) issued a February 22, 2011 60-Day Notice and Request for Comments regarding its use of a "Notice of Detention". I know, a lot of you are saying to yourselves, "When did CBP starting using Notices of Detention," and my response to you is "That's a darn good question!"

U.S. Customs Seizures and Forfeitures are Unique

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) seizes and forfeits hundreds of millions of dollars of merchandise every year. The IRS, DEA, Postal Service, and other Federal agencies also have the legal authority to seized and forfeit merchandise that were allegedly used illegally or were proceeds of alleged illegal activity, but CBP administrative and judicial forfeiture proceedures are unique. The answer is that seizes by CBP typically are not included within the Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act of 2000 (CAFRA).

By |2010-09-06T20:32:26-04:00September 6, 2010|Seizures|8 Comments
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