U.S. Customs – Your Personal Policeman at the Border

Many companies mistakenly believe that registering a trademark or copyright with the U.S. Government provides sufficient protection and remedies, and, therefore, do not take the extra step to record trademarks or copyrights with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (U.S. Customs).

The processes achieve two completely different goals.

Registering a trademark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) or copyright with the U.S. Copyright Office gives public notice of one’s ownership of the trademark or copyright. On the other hand, the purpose of recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs is to partner with the agency in preventing the unauthorized importation of merchandise that bears a recorded trademark or copyright. U.S. Customs prevents counterfeit and otherwise infringing products from entering or exiting the United States for registered trademark or copyright holders who have recorded their trademarks or copyrights with Customs.

U.S. Customs officials may detect infringing merchandise at the time of entry into the United States. When you record trademarks or copyrights with Customs, the information is entered into an electronic database accessible to U.S. Customs officers around the world. U.S. Customs uses this information to target suspect shipments for the purpose of physically examining merchandise which ultimately prevents the importation or exportation of infringing goods.

Advantages to Recording a Trademark or Copyright with Customs

The first and most obvious advantage to recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs is that the agency will monitor and seize infringing merchandise at the ports of entry. Because U.S. […]

Bloomberg: A Comparison of Customs IPR Protection in the U.S. & China

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz, is enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles, “A Comparison of Customs IPR Protection in the U.S. & China“! We want to thank Wen Peng, trademark attorney of Chofn Intellectual Property for her contributions. Below is the article reproduced with permission for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love to hear your feedback!

 

 

[…]

Jen Diaz to Moderate FCBF Webinar on IPR featuring CBP Branch Chief and UL

Diaz Trade Law is excited to announce that President Jennifer Diaz will be moderating the upcoming FCBF webinar titled “IPR with CBP and UL” with the Chief of the Intellectual Property Rights Branch of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Alaina van Horn, and UL Brand Protection Manager, Lisa Deere.

The Florida Customs Brokers & Forwarders Association (FCBF) encourages all custom brokers, patent, trademark and all international trade professional to join its Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and UL. This one-hour webinar will give custom brokers, importers, and all other international trade professionals the ability to learn and understand CBP’s IPR customs and enforcement. 

This webinar will be Friday, September 3, 2021 at 11:30 AM EST.  

Register Now! 

[…]

By |2021-09-02T16:43:47-04:00September 2, 2021|Best Practices, Counterfeits, Customs Broker, Import, International Trade, IPR, Trademarks and Logos, Seizures, Speaking, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on Jen Diaz to Moderate FCBF Webinar on IPR featuring CBP Branch Chief and UL

REGISTER TODAY! NEI Accredited Webinar Importing 101 – Introduction to U.S. Customs

Webinar Importing 101 Introduction to US CustomsWhether you are new to importing or seasoned, this one-hour webinar is a must attend. Register today to hear directly from this specialized, expert trio on the “Top 10 Tips When Importing to Ensure Compliance” with real case studies:

[…]

US Imposes Additional Tariffs on EU Goods

On Wednesday, January 6, 2021, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR), announced the revision of its Section 301 Action: Enforcement of U.S. WTO Rights in Large Civil Aircraft Dispute (86 FR 674).

 

[…]

USTR Announces Special 301 Review – Comments Due January 28

Special 301 Report

The United States Trade Representative (“USTR”) conducts an annual evaluation known as the Special 301 review. In the review, USTR identifies countries that deny adequate and effective protection of intellectual property (“IP”) rights or deny fair and equitable market access to U.S. persons who rely on IP protection. As a result of this review, trading partners that present the most significant concerns regarding IP rights are placed in one of three categories: 1) the Watch List, 2) the Priority Watch List, and 3) Priority Foreign Countries.

[…]

By |2021-10-12T15:08:59-04:00January 7, 2021|Best Practices, China Trade War, Customs Expert, International Law, International Trade, Special 301|Comments Off on USTR Announces Special 301 Review – Comments Due January 28

How CBP Protects Your Intellectual Property Rights at the Border / ¿Derechos de propiedad intelectual en la frontera?

IPR ---As an intellectual property right (IPR) owner, you have the right to work with CBP to prevent the unauthorized importation of infringing goods into the U.S. Registered trademarks, trade names, and copyrights can all be recorded with the with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). CBP helps trademark and copyright owners prevent the unauthorized importation of infringing products. CBP has the ability to detain, seize, and issue penalties to those who import goods which violate intellectual property rights.

This article will discuss:

[…]

Top 11 Copyright Myths and Misconceptions / Los Top Once Mitos y conceptos erróneos sobre los Derechos de Autor

1.- What is copyrightable and what is not?

Copyright protection exists in original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, now known or later developed, from which they can be perceived, reproduced, or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device.

Works of authorship include the following categories:

  • literary works;
  • musical works, including any accompanying words;
  • dramatic works, including any accompanying music;
  • pantomimes and choreographic works;
  • pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works;
  • motion pictures and other audiovisual works;
  • sound recordings; and
  • architectural works.

[…]

By |2021-10-29T14:56:09-04:00April 24, 2019|Best Practices, Counterfeits, International Business, International Law, IPR, Trademarks and Logos|Comments Off on Top 11 Copyright Myths and Misconceptions / Los Top Once Mitos y conceptos erróneos sobre los Derechos de Autor

34,143 IPR Seizures in 2017, Sets Record!

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is tasked with the monitoring of and enforcement of intellectual property rights (IPR). In DHS’s annual report, it discusses over 11 million containers arriving at seaports, 10 million transported on land by trucks, 3 million transported by train, and another quarter billion express packages transported by mail and plane. This report serves delves the work done by DHS.

The DHS’ annual report investigates products that infringe US trademarks and copyrights or are subject to exclusion orders issued by the US International Trade Commission as it threatens the health and safety of American consumers and poses risks to our national interests.
[…]

The UGG Boots Story: How Recording Your Registered Trademark Can Lead to a Jail Sentence

At the end of September 2017, Shi Wei Zheng, 42, plead guilty to one count of trafficking in counterfeit goods. During a five-month period, Zheng trafficked over 15,000 pairs of counterfeit UGG boots, with a total estimated retail value of over $2.5 million.

Zheng created an elaborate scheme in order to receive and sell counterfeit UGG boots. From September 2016 through February 2017, Zheng received several shipping containers from an individual overseas, of which at least three containers were filled with counterfeit UGG boots. After the containers reached the Port of Entry, in this instance, Port of Newark, Zheng had individuals working at the port, remove the containers from the port before U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) could examine them. Once removed, the containers were delivered to other individuals, paid by Zheng to distribute the counterfeit boots in New Jersey and other places. […]

Go to Top