Upcoming Training: CBP Regulations: Essential Practices for Import Success 

Join us in person at the World Trade Center Miami or on Zoom! Eligible for 3 CCS continuing education credits. 

 Many mistake the ease of importing to mean there is no liability or obligation on the part of the importer. However, if you import merchandise into the U.S., you may not realize, but, you are the responsible party! That means you have a duty to exercise “reasonable care” when importing.  

 What is reasonable care? Importers must conduct themselves as a reasonable importer would under the circumstance with respect to importing prior to entering goods into the United States. They must:  

  • Meet the standard to enter, classify and determine the value of imported goods 
  • Provide other information necessary to aid U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in properly assessing duties and collecting accurate statistics 
  • Determining whether other applicable legal standards and requirements have been met 

Read more about reasonable care in our Bloomberg Law article here. 

All importers should have a plan in place to navigate merchandise descriptions & classification, product valuation, country of origin, intellectual property rights, forced labor, quotas, requirements of other agencies, and more. 

In this presentation, our speakers will discuss how to comply with CBP’s vast laws and regulations. By the end of […]

By |2024-05-17T09:24:50-04:00May 17, 2024|Best Practices, Import|0 Comments

From Chaos to Compliance: A Guide for Importers

Many mistake the ease of importing to mean there is no liability or obligation on the part of the importer. Whether your company is new to importing, or has been in the business for years, CBP expects importers to use “reasonable care” to ensure compliance with relevant rules and regulations. Importers are at risk of being subject to enforcement actions by CBP if they do not comply with the reasonable care standard when importing goods into the U.S. This article provides an overview of CBP’s expectations of an importer and practical advice on what you must have in your import compliance plan.

How Did We Get Here?

December 8th, 1993, the Dow Jones reached a record high of 3734.53, Janet Jackson’s “Again” remained number one on the charts, and President Bill Clinton signed the Customs Modernization Act (Mod Act). The Mod Act altered the import compliance landscape by making it the responsibility of the importer to classify items, determine their value, etc. The law also imposed a legal obligation to use “reasonable care” in doing so, or else Customs could (and would) impose penalties.

What Exactly is “Reasonable Care”?

Reasonable care requires importers to conduct themselves as a reasonable importer would under the circumstance with respect to importing goods into the United States.

Reasonable care requires importers to:

  • Meet the standard to enter, classify and determine the value of imported goods
  • Provide other information necessary to aid CBP in properly assessing duties and collecting accurate statistics
  • Determine whether other applicable legal standards and […]
By |2024-04-19T16:11:26-04:00April 19, 2024|Import, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on From Chaos to Compliance: A Guide for Importers

Ford Motor Company Settles Claims Relating to Under-Valued Vehicles for $365M

Ford Motor Company has agreed to pay $365 million for allegedly misclassifying and understating the value of hundreds of thousands of vehicles.

According to the Department of Justice, Ford engaged in a scheme to avoid higher duties by misclassifying cargo vans. Between 2009 and 2013, the company imported Transit Connect cargo vans into the United States but presented them to Customs and Border Protection (CBP) with temporary seats and other features to make them appear to be passenger vehicles. The seats were never intended to carry passengers and Ford removed them as part of post-importation processing. The inclusion of the seats allowed Ford to avoid paying the 25% duty rate for cargo vehicles and instead they paid a duty rate of just 2.5%.

This case dates back to February 2012 when the Port of Baltimore advised Ford it was initiating an investigation into Ford’s classification practices. (Typically, prior to investigating an entity, CBP sends a request for information first. For more information on how this process typically begins read “Now, More than Ever, Be Wary of and Responsive to a CBP Form 28!”).

In 2013 Customs determined that the vans were improperly classified and liquidated the vehicles at the 25% duty rate. Ford protested, and Customs denied the protest. Ford then filed a complaint with the U.S. Court of International Trade (CIT). The CIT agreed with Ford, finding that Ford engaged in legitimate tariff engineering. The government appealed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit where […]

By |2024-03-15T14:50:57-04:00March 15, 2024|Import, Penalty|Comments Off on Ford Motor Company Settles Claims Relating to Under-Valued Vehicles for $365M

International Trade Today: CBP Policy Change Makes Extensions for Prior Disclosures More Difficult

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz is enthusiastic to announce International Trade Today featured her perspective in their recent article, “CBP Policy Change Makes Extensions for Prior Disclosures More Difficult, Lawyer Says“! Below is the article reproduced for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access the link to the CBP guidance).

A previous article written by Jen and Sharath focuses on how to successfully submit a prior disclosure (PD) to Customs and Border Protection, along with details known of CBP’s new timing requirements, which had not been circulated publicly (prior to our FOIA request). We truly feel CBP’s new deadlines place a burden on importers that must be considered PRIOR to filing a PD. If you are considering filing a Prior Disclosure – PLEASE communicate with counsel first.

Please note you cannot click on the hyperlink below. We’d love to hear your feedback!

 

 

 

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How to Build and Maintain an Effective Import Compliance Plan

CBP enforcement is on the rise.  If your business is importing into the U.S., or wants to start, our one-hour, NEI accredited, webinar on “Building & Maintaining an Effective Import Compliance Plan”  will provide best practices and TOP tips to build an import compliance plan.

Register today to to hear directly from Senior Trade Advisor, Don Woods, DTL’s president, Jennifer Diaz, and Associate Attorney, Denise Calle as they discuss real life stories, current trends/risks associated with the import process, proactive ways to stay compliant, and the importance of training to avoid costly encounters with CBP. […]

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