Upcoming Training: CBP Regulations: Essential Practices for Import Success 

Join us in person at the World Trade Center Miami or on Zoom! Eligible for 3 CCS continuing education credits. 

 Many mistake the ease of importing to mean there is no liability or obligation on the part of the importer. However, if you import merchandise into the U.S., you may not realize, but, you are the responsible party! That means you have a duty to exercise “reasonable care” when importing.  

 What is reasonable care? Importers must conduct themselves as a reasonable importer would under the circumstance with respect to importing prior to entering goods into the United States. They must:  

  • Meet the standard to enter, classify and determine the value of imported goods 
  • Provide other information necessary to aid U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) in properly assessing duties and collecting accurate statistics 
  • Determining whether other applicable legal standards and requirements have been met 

Read more about reasonable care in our Bloomberg Law article here. 

All importers should have a plan in place to navigate merchandise descriptions & classification, product valuation, country of origin, intellectual property rights, forced labor, quotas, requirements of other agencies, and more. 

In this presentation, our speakers will discuss how to comply with CBP’s vast laws and regulations. By the end of […]

By |2024-05-17T09:24:50-04:00May 17, 2024|Best Practices, Import|Comments Off on Upcoming Training: CBP Regulations: Essential Practices for Import Success 

From Chaos to Compliance: A Guide for Importers

Many mistake the ease of importing to mean there is no liability or obligation on the part of the importer. Whether your company is new to importing, or has been in the business for years, CBP expects importers to use “reasonable care” to ensure compliance with relevant rules and regulations. Importers are at risk of being subject to enforcement actions by CBP if they do not comply with the reasonable care standard when importing goods into the U.S. This article provides an overview of CBP’s expectations of an importer and practical advice on what you must have in your import compliance plan.

How Did We Get Here?

December 8th, 1993, the Dow Jones reached a record high of 3734.53, Janet Jackson’s “Again” remained number one on the charts, and President Bill Clinton signed the Customs Modernization Act (Mod Act). The Mod Act altered the import compliance landscape by making it the responsibility of the importer to classify items, determine their value, etc. The law also imposed a legal obligation to use “reasonable care” in doing so, or else Customs could (and would) impose penalties.

What Exactly is “Reasonable Care”?

Reasonable care requires importers to conduct themselves as a reasonable importer would under the circumstance with respect to importing goods into the United States.

Reasonable care requires importers to:

  • Meet the standard to enter, classify and determine the value of imported goods
  • Provide other information necessary to aid CBP in properly assessing duties and collecting accurate statistics
  • Determine whether other applicable legal standards and […]
By |2024-04-19T16:11:26-04:00April 19, 2024|Import, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on From Chaos to Compliance: A Guide for Importers

How to Build and Maintain an Effective Import Compliance Plan

CBP enforcement is on the rise.  If your business is importing into the U.S., or wants to start, our one-hour, NEI accredited, webinar on “Building & Maintaining an Effective Import Compliance Plan”  will provide best practices and TOP tips to build an import compliance plan.

Register today to to hear directly from Senior Trade Advisor, Don Woods, DTL’s president, Jennifer Diaz, and Associate Attorney, Denise Calle as they discuss real life stories, current trends/risks associated with the import process, proactive ways to stay compliant, and the importance of training to avoid costly encounters with CBP. […]

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