Bloomberg: Tariff Classification Basics

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz, and Associate Attorney, Sharath Patil, are enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles, “Tariff Classification Basics“! Below is the article reproduced with permission for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love to hear your feedback!

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By |2022-04-25T16:09:29-04:00January 26, 2022|Bloomberg, Bloomberg Import, HTS, Import, International Trade, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on Bloomberg: Tariff Classification Basics

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

Apparel

  • Nike has ended 2021 as the most valuable apparel firm globally. According to data presented by FinancePR.com, the American outfit achieved a $30.44 billion valuation in 2021, placing it at the helm of the top ten garment firms worldwide.

CBP 

9801.00.10: Updated Requirements for Returned Goods

Background on HTSUS Subheading 9801.00.10

Ever hear of U.S. goods returned and wondered what it really meant? The Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (“HTSUS”) subheading 9801.00.10 is used for re-importing U.S. made products back into the United States, duty-free. Previously, this classification only covered merchandise originally made in the United States and now reentering the country (hence “US Goods Returned”). In order to qualify for classification under subheading 9801.00.10 and duty-free treatment, these products entering the United States had to be unimproved in condition or value. In other words, the products had to not be subject to further processing abroad. For example, subheading 9801.00.10 may be used when goods are being re-imported as returned product to the seller or for repair. Under subheading 9801.00.10, the importer has the burden to prove their claim for duty-free treatment.

CBP Issues Updated Guidance

On August 20, 2021, subheading 9801.00.10 was expanded to include products which originated from foreign countries. HTSUS subheading 9801.00.10 now states: “Products of the United States when returned after having been exported, or any other products when returned within 3 years after having been exported, without having been advanced in value or improved in condition by any process of manufacture or other means while abroad.” In other words, non-U.S. origin products that are returned to the United States will ALSO qualify for duty-free treatment under subheading 9801.00.10. However, the timing requirements for U.S.-origin and foreign-origin products are different. U.S.-origin products currently have no time limit to file […]

By |2021-11-09T12:23:27-05:00November 23, 2021|ACE, Best Practices, Customs Broker, Customs Expert, Enforcement, Import, International Trade, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on 9801.00.10: Updated Requirements for Returned Goods

Customs Classification – A Key Component of an Import Compliance Manual

We are often asked by importers to assist in classifying their products under the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the U.S. (“HTS” or “HTSUS”). While seeking assistance from expert counsel is a best practice, under the CBP Modernization Act, an importer of record (“IOR”) is the sole party responsible for determining the correct classification of imported goods (and thereby paying the correct amount of customs duties). An IOR must use reasonable care in classifying its product at the time of entry. Should an importer misclassify their products and not pay the appropriate duties to CBP at the time of importation; the importer is exposing itself to potential CBP penalties under 19 U.S.C. 1592.  The process of classifying goods can be a tedious process and may require time and research to arrive at the correct HTSUS number for any one product.

This blog expands our prior blog, Crash Course in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States, and provides additional detail on the classification process and tips for importers to use when deciding on a classification its customs broker will declare to CBP.  Importers are encouraged to attend the webinar How to Build and Maintain an Effective Import Compliance Plan on October 6, 2021 (and on-demand) for best practices on how to build and maintain an import compliance plan by addressing common risks associated with the import process – including product classification.

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By |2021-10-01T09:48:07-04:00October 4, 2021|Best Practices, Enforcement, HTS, Import, Pre-compliance, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on Customs Classification – A Key Component of an Import Compliance Manual

US Imposes Additional Tariffs on EU Goods

On Wednesday, January 6, 2021, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR), announced the revision of its Section 301 Action: Enforcement of U.S. WTO Rights in Large Civil Aircraft Dispute (86 FR 674).

 

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USTR Announces China 301 Tariff Exclusion Extensions for COVID-Related Products

On December 29, 2020, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (“USTR”) announced long-awaited extensions to a limited set of previously granted exclusions (for COVID-related products), that were set to expire on December 31, 2020. Meanwhile, importers across non-COVID industries are continuing to await guidance on their tariff exclusion extensions that are set to expire on December 31, 2020.

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China Tariff Hike Postponed – USTR to Establish an Exclusion Process – Seminar on “China Tariffs/AD/CVD 101”

The on-going trade war continues as China and the US make progress to come to an agreement. For background information on past actions taken by the Trump Administration to protect American Intellectual Property, check out our previous blogs.

China Tariff Increase is Postponed

President Trump reported in a February 24th tweet that as a result of the “substantial progress” in trade negotiations with China on “important structural issues” he will be delaying the increase from 10 percent to 25 percent in the additional Section 301 tariffs on the List 3 goods (valued at about US$200 billion) that is scheduled to take place on  March 2nd. To formalize the extension, the administration will have to publish a Federal Register notice stating the Section 301 additional tariff on the so-called List 3 products will remain at ten percent for now and the notice will likely provide the new date for the tariff increase. To date no formal notice has been published.

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Update – Deadline Approaching – A Snapshot of Section 301 Duties & Your Options!

The trade war has kept members in the trade industry on their toes – here is a recap.

Effective Dates:

For importers being hit by additional duties, it is crucial to know when the additional duties are effective and must be paid. USTR has issued three lists under 301 Section Trade Remedies. We urge importers to get to know which list their products are subject to, and develop an action plan. […]

A Snapshot of Section 301 Effective dates and Deadline for Exclusion Request

The trade war has kept members in the trade industry on their toes – here is a recap.

Effective Dates:

For importers being hit by additional duties it is crucial to know when the additional duties are effective and must be paid. USTR has now issued three lists under 301 Section Trade Remedies. We urge importers to clearly understand which list their products are subject to and develop a business plan on how to prepare for additional import costs. […]

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