Updates to CBP’s Global Business Identifier Test

On February 12, 2024, CBP announced key updates to the ongoing Global Business Identifier Evaluative Proof of Concept (GBI EPoC). The agency extended the test from February 12, 2024, through February 23, 2027, clarified the purpose and scope of the test, and expanded the test to include more entry types and countries of origin.

GBI EPoC Background

The Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) is the system through which the U.S. Government processes trade-related import and export data. The transition away from paper-based procedures has resulted in faster, more streamlined processes for both the U.S. Government and industry. To continue this progress, CBP began working with the Border Interagency Executive Council (BIEC) and the Commercial Customs Operations Advisory Committee (COAC) starting in 2017, to discuss the continuing viability of the data element known as the manufacturer or shipper identification code (MID).

Although use of the MID has served CBP and the international trade community well in the past, it became apparent that the MID is not always a consistent or unique number. 

CBP thus engaged in regular outreach with stakeholders in the trade community with the goal of establishing a global entity identifier system. As a result of these discussions, CBP developed GBI EPoC, an interagency trade transformation project that aims to test and develop a single entity identifier solution. 

Through the GBI EPoC, CBP aims to develop a systematic, accurate, and efficient method for the U.S. […]

By |2024-02-20T11:59:28-05:00February 19, 2024|U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on Updates to CBP’s Global Business Identifier Test

Customs Classification – A Key Component of an Import Compliance Manual

We are often asked by importers to assist in classifying their products under the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the U.S. (“HTS” or “HTSUS”). While seeking assistance from expert counsel is a best practice, under the CBP Modernization Act, an importer of record (“IOR”) is the sole party responsible for determining the correct classification of imported goods (and thereby paying the correct amount of customs duties). An IOR must use reasonable care in classifying its product at the time of entry. Should an importer misclassify their products and not pay the appropriate duties to CBP at the time of importation; the importer is exposing itself to potential CBP penalties under 19 U.S.C. 1592.  The process of classifying goods can be a tedious process and may require time and research to arrive at the correct HTSUS number for any one product.

This blog expands our prior blog, Crash Course in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States, and provides additional detail on the classification process and tips for importers to use when deciding on a classification its customs broker will declare to CBP.  Importers are encouraged to attend the webinar How to Build and Maintain an Effective Import Compliance Plan on October 6, 2021 (and on-demand) for best practices on how to build and maintain an import compliance plan by addressing common risks associated with the import process – including product classification.

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By |2021-10-01T09:48:07-04:00October 4, 2021|Best Practices, Enforcement, HTS, Import, Pre-compliance, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on Customs Classification – A Key Component of an Import Compliance Manual

USTR Announces China 301 Tariff Exclusion Extensions for COVID-Related Products

On December 29, 2020, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (“USTR”) announced long-awaited extensions to a limited set of previously granted exclusions (for COVID-related products), that were set to expire on December 31, 2020. Meanwhile, importers across non-COVID industries are continuing to await guidance on their tariff exclusion extensions that are set to expire on December 31, 2020.

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Update – Deadline Approaching – A Snapshot of Section 301 Duties & Your Options!

The trade war has kept members in the trade industry on their toes – here is a recap.

Effective Dates:

For importers being hit by additional duties, it is crucial to know when the additional duties are effective and must be paid. USTR has issued three lists under 301 Section Trade Remedies. We urge importers to get to know which list their products are subject to, and develop an action plan. […]

A Snapshot of Section 301 Effective dates and Deadline for Exclusion Request

The trade war has kept members in the trade industry on their toes – here is a recap.

Effective Dates:

For importers being hit by additional duties it is crucial to know when the additional duties are effective and must be paid. USTR has now issued three lists under 301 Section Trade Remedies. We urge importers to clearly understand which list their products are subject to and develop a business plan on how to prepare for additional import costs. […]

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