Understanding the RPL Export License Exception

U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to U.S. export control laws, including the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”). Administered by the U.S. Commerce Department, the EAR is a set of regulations which governs whether U.S. persons may export or transfer goods, software, and technology outside of the United States or to non-U.S. citizens. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to the EAR. Violations of the EAR carry hefty civil and criminal penalties. Exporters can pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in penalties, lose export privileges, and even be imprisoned.

Licensing Exception for “Servicing and Replacement of Parts and Equipment” (RPL)

An export license under the EAR is not necessary if the License Exception for “Servicing and Replacement of Parts and Equipment” (“RPL”) applies. License Exception RPL is described under Part 740.10 of the EAR. RPL is known as a transaction-based exception because the availability/applicability of the exception is based on the terms of the transaction.

According to BIS guidance, the RPL License Exception may be used for the two following scenarios:

  • Replacement Parts – This authorizes the export and reexport of replacement parts for the immediate repair of previously exported, reexported or foreign made equipment incorporating U.S. origin parts on a one-for-one replacement basis. It also authorizes the export and reexport of stock spare parts that were authorized to accompany the export of equipment.
  • Servicing and Replacement – Replacements for defective or unacceptable U.S.-origin equipment. (a) The commodity or software to be replaced must have been […]

Exporting 101 – Introduction to Export Controls

On April 30, 2021, the Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) announced that it had fined FLIR Systems, Inc. $307,922 for an egregious violation of the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”) for misrepresentations made in commodity jurisdiction (“CJ”) requests. A BIS spokesperson said: “BIS will not tolerate exporters that provide inaccurate or incomplete representations related to export regulations and laws.”

This recent announcement is a textbook example of why it is important to obtain counsel and be  both proactive and truthful in regards to your export compliance. Whether you are new to exporting or looking to understand the foundations of export controls, including a discussion of recent penalty cases like FLIR’s (so they do not happen to you), or a seasoned professional looking to understand the latest developments, this one-hour webinar is a must attend. Register today to hear directly from the following expert duo:

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