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currency

Best PracticesCurrency SeizureInvestigationSeizuresU.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)

Civil Forfeiture – Know Your Rights!

posted by Jennifer Diaz February 27, 2019 2 Comments

Sam

Routinely, individuals in the U.S. have property taken from them under “Asset Forfeiture” laws and are unaware of their rights.  Civil judicial forfeiture does not require a criminal conviction, and is a powerful legal tool used by law enforcement and Federal Agencies to seize property that is involved in a crime. Fines and forfeitures have become a key source of revenue, bringing in hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

The majority of federal forfeiture cases are uncontested when there is a related criminal case. Administrative forfeiture occurs when property is seized but no one files a claim to contest the seizure. Property that can be administratively forfeited includes merchandise prohibited from importation; a conveyance used to import, transport, or store a controlled substance; a monetary instrument; or other property that does not exceed $500,000 in value. Federal law imposes strict deadlines and notification requirements in the administrative forfeiture process. If the seizure is contested, then the U.S. government is required to use either criminal or civil judicial forfeiture proceedings to gain title to the property.

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Currency SeizureInternational TravelSeizuresU.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)

International Travelers Beware – U.S. Customs WILL Seize Your Money…

posted by Jennifer Diaz December 13, 2013 9 Comments

Money given away

International travelers often contact me with the same distraught face as the man pictured to my left, after their money is confiscated by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) as a result of not properly declaring currency on hand.

Declaration Form 6059B will look familiar to all international travelers as you fill it out when entering the U.S.  Many times, the rationale for seizure is that parties traveling together split their currency, and even though together they have over the $10,000 minimum, the travelers advise they are each carrying less then the $10,000 minimum requirement for reporting (in question 13 of Form 6059B), resulting in ALL of the currency on hand being seized. On a Typical Day in Fiscal Year 2015, CBP seized $356,396 in undeclared or illicit currency.

Recently, CBP seized $82,000 of currency, and arrested the female driver, after discovering three packages of bulk currency hidden within a vehicle as a female driver attempted to exit the U.S. and enter Mexico.

During this holiday season, this post will tell you what you need to know to assure it’s NOT YOU that has their currency seized when traveling internationally!

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Currency SeizureSeizuresU.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)

Don’t Let Your Currency be Seized When Traveling Internationally – TOP TIPS

posted by Jennifer Diaz November 20, 2012 3 Comments

The holidays are approaching… Do you intend to carry “monetary instruments” when traveling internationally?

Read on, these TOP 5 Tips when carrying “monetary instruments” above $10,000 can save you a U.S. Customs Seizure Case.

Here are your top tips to assure you get it right, and you’re not screaming “Help – U.S. Customs Took my Money at the Airport”.

1. If you intend to carry over $10,000 in monetary instruments, including travelers checks and U.S. or foreign money, you MUST fill out the required form, FINCEN Form 105.  Note, it is PERFECTLY acceptable to travel with currency, you JUST have to report it. Don’t be scared to do so.

2. Review U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s “Currency Reporting” flyer.  Make sure you memorize what “monetary instruments” consist of:

  • U.S. or foreign coins and currency;
  • Travelers checks (in any form);
  • Negotiable Instruments (including checks, promissory notes, and money orders – in a transferable form);
  • Incomplete instruments (checks, promissory notes, and money orders) that are signed with a payees name omitted;
  • Securities or stock in bearer form (in a transferable form)

3. Make sure you can explain the legitimate source of the money.

4. Make sure you can explain the legitimate intended use of the money.

5. Don’t divide currency for the purpose of evading reporting requirements.

Check out CBP’s recent seizures of currency and DON’T LET THIS HAPPEN TO YOU!:

 

Currency SeizureSeizuresU.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)

Help! U.S. Customs Took My Money at the Airport / ¡Ayuda! La Aduana de los Estados Unidos Incautó Mi Dinero en el Aeropuerto

posted by Jennifer Diaz February 1, 2010 118 Comments

You may legally carry or mail any amount of money you want into or out of the United States, but if it is more than $10,000 at one time, you better first report it to U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Otherwise, you risk U.S. Customs taking it from you, and never getting it back. Why?  Because your failure to report the international transportation of money is a violation of the Currency and Foreign Transaction Reporting Act.

All too often, I am contacted by a distraught American citizen or resident returning from a trip overseas, or a foreign visitor to the United States, who was unaware of the laws regarding currency reporting.  The person was asked by a U.S. Customs officer upon arrival at the international airport if he or she was carrying over $10,000. When the passenger honestly answer “yes”, or the U.S. Customs officer believes the passenger may be lying about the amount of money being transported, the passenger and his or her luggage are examined.  If over $10,000 in monetary instruments, including travelers checks and U.S. or foreign money, is discovered, and the required form, FINCEN Form 105, has not been filed with U.S. Customs, all of the money is likely to be seized on the spot by U.S. Customs.

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