Trade News: New Petition Filed Against Tungsten Shot from China

Tungsten Parts Wyoming, Inc. filed the petition for the imposition of antidumping and countervailing (AD/CVD) duties on the imports of tungsten shot from China.

Unlike most AD/CVD petitions, the domestic industry has not yet been established, as the petitioner only began production last year. Thus, instead of arguing that Chinese imports are injuring the industry, the petitioner is claiming that the domestic industry has been “materially retarded” by reason of the allegedly unfair Chinese imports.

Full list of exporters. Full list of importers.

Background on AD/CVD Investigations

Antidumping duty (“AD”) and countervailing duty (“CVD”) investigations are brought jointly by the U.S. International Trade Commission (“USITC”) and the U.S. Department of Commerce (“Commerce”). AD investigations are triggered when a domestic industry alleges that it has been injured by competing imports of particular goods from specific countries being sold at less than a fair value. Meanwhile, CVD investigations are triggered when a domestic industry alleges that it has been injured by competing imports that are being unfairly subsidized by their governments. 

Scope of the Investigation

This investigation pertains to certain tungsten shot. The physical characteristics of the covered product are tungsten shot that are 92.6 percent or greater tungsten by weight. Merchandise is covered regardless of the combination of compounds that comprise the non-tungsten material and whether or not the tungsten shot is additionally coated with another material, including but not limited […]

DHS Announces New High Priority Sectors for UFLPA Enforcement

The Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force (FLETF) released an update to the Strategy to Prevent the Importation of Goods Mined, Produced, or Manufactured with Forced Labor in the People’s Republic of China.

Strategy Background

DHS released the first publication of the UFLPA Strategy in June 2022. The strategy outlines a multi-pronged approach to combating forced labor in global supply chains.The strategy includes a comprehensive assessment of the risk of importing goods with forced labor in the PRC, high priority sectors for enforcement, guidance to importers, recommendations to accurately identify affected goods, and more. DHS released the first update to the publication in August of 2023.

The Latest Update  

The update builds on two years of the Administration’s enforcement of the UFLPA. The latest strategy identified new high priority sectors for enforcement – aluminum, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and seafood. These industries were identified due to higher risk of forced labor or state labor transfer of Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities from the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR).

Entities in these sectors will now be prioritized for review for enforcement actions such as inclusion on the UFLPA Entity List, sanctions, export limitations, and visa restrictions.

Other products previously identified as high priority such as apparel, cotton and cotton products, silica-based products including polysilicon, and tomatoes remain high priority sectors.

The latest updates also outline how the FLETF has significantly advanced their objectives through several initiatives, such as strong enforcement by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP); expansion of the UFLPA Entity List; […]

Trade News: New Petition Filed Against Low Speed Personal Transportation Vehicles from China

The American Personal Transportation Vehicle Manufacturers Coalition filed petitions for the imposition of antidumping and countervailing (AD/CVD) duties on the imports of certain low speed personal transportation vehicles (“CLSPTV”) from China.

Full list of exporters here. Full list of importers here.

Background on AD/CVD Investigations

Antidumping duty (“AD”) and countervailing duty (“CVD”) investigations are brought jointly by the U.S. International Trade Commission (“USITC”) and the U.S. Department of Commerce (“Commerce”). AD investigations are triggered when a domestic industry alleges that it has been injured by competing imports of particular goods from specific countries being sold at less than a fair value. Meanwhile, CVD investigations are triggered when a domestic industry alleges that it has been injured by competing imports that are being unfairly subsidized by their governments. 

Scope of the Investigation

This petition covers CLSPTVs and subassemblies thereof. CLSPTVs meeting this description are generally open air vehicles with a minimum of four wheels, a steering wheel, a traditional side-by-side or in- line row seating arrangement (i.e., non- straddle), foot operated accelerator and brake pedals, and a gross vehicle weight of no greater than 5,500 pounds. 

Specifically excluded from the scope of this order are all-terrain vehicles, multipurpose off highway utility vehicles, and recreational off-highway vehicles.  Full scope here.

Next Steps

The Commerce Department will determine whether to initiate the investigations within 20 days. The USITC […]

By |2024-06-24T14:25:19-04:00June 24, 2024|AD/CVD, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)|Comments Off on Trade News: New Petition Filed Against Low Speed Personal Transportation Vehicles from China

Trade News: New Petition Filed on Alkyl Phosphate Esters from China

A petition was filed on April 23, 2024 that alleges alkyl phosphate esters from China are being sold at less than fair value and benefiting from countervailing subsidies. The petition was filed by ICL-IP America, Inc., a subsidiary of the ICL Group (“ICL”). Alleged dumping margins range from 45.1% to 68.4%.

Full list of producers here. Full list of U.S. importers here.

The scope of petition covers alkyl phosphate esters based exclusively on side chains with a length of two or three carbon atoms and a phosphorus content of at least 6.5 percent (per weight) and a viscosity between 1 and 2000 mPa.s (at 20-25 °C).  Full scope here.

The Commerce Department will determine whether to initiate the investigations within 20 days. The USITC will reach a preliminary determination of material injury or threat of material injury within 45 days.

As with any proceeding, participation is very important to protect your rights. We urge anyone that imports alkyl phosphate esters to pay close attention to this case and to ensure that all appropriate steps are taken to mitigate any damage.

Diaz Trade Law will continue to monitor this case and share updates. For more information or questions get in touch with us at 305-456-3830 or info@diaztradelaw.com.

By |2024-04-24T11:38:59-04:00April 24, 2024|AD/CVD, China, Countries, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)|Comments Off on Trade News: New Petition Filed on Alkyl Phosphate Esters from China

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

U.S. Customs – Your Personal Policeman at the Border

Many companies mistakenly believe that registering a trademark or copyright with the U.S. Government provides sufficient protection and remedies, and, therefore, do not take the extra step to record trademarks or copyrights with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (U.S. Customs).

The processes achieve two completely different goals.

Registering a trademark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) or copyright with the U.S. Copyright Office gives public notice of one’s ownership of the trademark or copyright. On the other hand, the purpose of recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs is to partner with the agency in preventing the unauthorized importation of merchandise that bears a recorded trademark or copyright. U.S. Customs prevents counterfeit and otherwise infringing products from entering or exiting the United States for registered trademark or copyright holders who have recorded their trademarks or copyrights with Customs.

U.S. Customs officials may detect infringing merchandise at the time of entry into the United States. When you record trademarks or copyrights with Customs, the information is entered into an electronic database accessible to U.S. Customs officers around the world. U.S. Customs uses this information to target suspect shipments for the purpose of physically examining merchandise which ultimately prevents the importation or exportation of infringing goods.

Advantages to Recording a Trademark or Copyright with Customs

The first and most obvious advantage to recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs is that the agency will monitor and seize infringing merchandise at the ports of entry. Because U.S. […]

Bloomberg: A Comparison of Customs IPR Protection in the U.S. & China

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz, is enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles, “A Comparison of Customs IPR Protection in the U.S. & China“! We want to thank Wen Peng, trademark attorney of Chofn Intellectual Property for her contributions. Below is the article reproduced with permission for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love to hear your feedback!

 

 

[…]

Big News! 352 of 549 Proposed China Tariff Exclusions Reinstated

On March 23, 2022, the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) announced that 352 of the 549 proposed exclusions have been reinstated. The reinstated product exclusions will apply as of October 12, 2021, and extend through December 31, 2022. For a full list of reinstated exclusions, please see this Federal Register announcement.

On October 8, 2021, USTR invited comments on whether to reinstate 549 previously granted and extended exclusions. This recent determination was a result of USTR’s review of public comments regarding whether and which of the proposed exclusions should be reinstated.

Diaz Trade Law filed comments on behalf of several clients who have had their exclusions reinstated. Are your products on the list of exclusions that were reinstated? Do you have questions about navigating Section 301 China tariffs? We are here for you! Diaz Trade Law has significant experience working on Section 301 exclusions. Contact us today at info@diaztradelaw.com.

 

A list of all the exclusions can be found below:

A. Effective with respect to good entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for
consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on October 12, 2021, and before
11:59 p.m. eastern daylight time on December 31, 2022, subchapter III of chapter 99 of the
Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) is modified:
1. by inserting the following new heading 9903.88.67 in numerical sequence, with the
material in the new heading inserted in the columns of the HTSUS labeled
“Heading/Subheading”, “Article Description”, and “Rates of Duty 1-General”,
respectively:
Heading/Subheading: 9903.88.67

Article Description: Effective with respect to entries on or after
October 12, […]

By |2022-03-28T10:37:08-04:00March 23, 2022|301 INVESTIGATIONS, ACE, China, China Trade War, Import, Reasonable Care, Trade Policy, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Trade Representative (USTR)|Comments Off on Big News! 352 of 549 Proposed China Tariff Exclusions Reinstated
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