14 10, 2022

Customs and Weekly Trade Snapshot

By |2022-10-13T17:29:48-04:00October 14, 2022|AD/CVD, EAR, HTS, Import Alert, International Trade, IRAN, People's Republic of China, Russian Harmful Foreign Activities Sanctions Regulations, SDN List, Special 301, Trade Policy, U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC), U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC), U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), U.S. Trade Representative (USTR)|Comments Off on Customs and Weekly Trade Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

7 10, 2022

Customs and Weekly Trade Snapshot

By |2022-10-13T17:00:35-04:00October 7, 2022|China, International Law, International Trade, IRAN, Mexico, Russia, Taiwan, U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), U.S. Court of International Trade, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC), U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC), U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), U.S. Trade Representative (USTR), Uncategorized|Comments Off on Customs and Weekly Trade Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

4 10, 2022

Customs Undervaluation – It’s a Crime

By |2022-09-29T11:30:35-04:00October 4, 2022|Best Practices, International Trade, Seizures, U.S. Census Bureau, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)|Comments Off on Customs Undervaluation – It’s a Crime

Customs Valuation is a procedure to determine the customs value of imported goods. The customs value is essential to calculate the total duty to be paid on an imported good. As part of its agreement with the World Trade Organization (“WTO”), the U.S. is part of an internationally standardized system of valuing imports. This standardized system allows for CBP to protect revenue, ensure reasonable care from importers, and accurately calculate Census trade statistics. Accordingly, it is critical to declare the value of importations accurately and compliantly. 

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) valuation methodology (as well as a summary of relevant Customs rulings) are described in detail in the Valuation Encyclopedia (i.e., the best resource on valuation inquiries). CBP permits merchandise to be valued according to one of the six valuation methods listed below. The methods are applied sequentially from first to last until an applicable value is determined. If the first method does not apply, the importer must then evaluate the second, and so on, until an appropriate method applies. The only exception to this sequential evaluation requirement is when evaluating between deductive value and computed value – an importer may choose to use the computed value before the deductive value.

Methods of Valuation:

  1. The transaction value of imported merchandise (the majority of imports use transaction value – i.e., the price paid or payable plus assists (see below))
  2. The transaction value of identical merchandise
  3. The transaction value of similar merchandise
  4. Deductive value
  5. Computed […]
23 09, 2022

Customs and Trade Weekly Snapshot

By |2022-09-22T16:13:32-04:00September 23, 2022|China, International Trade, Russia, Socialist Republic of Vietnam, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC), U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC), U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), U.S. Trade Representative (USTR), Vietnam|Comments Off on Customs and Trade Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

20 09, 2022

By |2022-09-16T10:28:29-04:00September 20, 2022|Best Practices, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Export, Export|Comments Off on

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz, and Associate Attorney, Sharath Patil, are enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles, “Submitting a Prior Disclosure to Customs & Border Protection“! Below is the article reproduced with permission for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love to hear your feedback!

 

 

 

[…]

16 09, 2022

Customs and Trade Weekly Snapshot

By |2022-09-15T16:24:58-04:00September 16, 2022|China, COVID-19, IRAN, Mexico, People's Republic of China, Russia, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC), U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC), U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), Vietnam|Comments Off on Customs and Trade Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

 

United States Department of Commerce (DOC)

  • The U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) determines that carbon and alloy steel threaded rod (steel threaded rod) from India is not being sold in the United States at below normal value.  
  •  As a result of the respective determinations by the DOC and the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) that termination of the 2016 Agreement Suspending the Antidumping Duty Investigation on Lemon Juice from Argentina (2016 Agreement) and the underlying antidumping duty investigation on lemon juice from Argentina would likely lead to continuation or recurrence of dumping 
  • The DOC preliminarily finds that Hangzhou Ailong Metal Products Co., Ltd. (Ailong) made sales of subject merchandise at prices below normal value (NV) 
  • On July 29, 2022, the DOC published the preliminary results of the changed circumstances review (CCR) of the antidumping duty (AD) order on multilayered wood flooring (MLWF) from the People’s Republic of China (China). 
  • The DOC published a notice in the Federal Register on August 2, 2022, for the preliminary results and partial recission of the 2020–2021 administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain pasta (pasta) from Italy 
  • The DOC preliminarily finds […]
9 09, 2022

Customs and Trade Weekly Snapshot

By |2022-09-09T15:59:48-04:00September 9, 2022|301 INVESTIGATIONS, China, China Trade War, EAR, Export, Import, International Trade, IPR, Trademarks and Logos, IRAN, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, Snapshot, Supply Chain, Trade Policy, U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), U.S. Trade Representative (USTR)|Comments Off on Customs and Trade Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

[…]

8 09, 2022

U.S. Customs – Your Personal Policeman at the Border

By |2022-09-08T18:54:54-04:00September 8, 2022|China, Counterfeits, Enforcement, Import, International Trade, IPR, Trademarks and Logos, Pre-compliance, Speaking, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on U.S. Customs – Your Personal Policeman at the Border

Many companies mistakenly believe that registering a trademark or copyright with the U.S. Government provides sufficient protection and remedies, and, therefore, do not take the extra step to record trademarks or copyrights with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (U.S. Customs).

The processes achieve two completely different goals.

Registering a trademark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) or copyright with the U.S. Copyright Office gives public notice of one’s ownership of the trademark or copyright. On the other hand, the purpose of recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs is to partner with the agency in preventing the unauthorized importation of merchandise that bears a recorded trademark or copyright. U.S. Customs prevents counterfeit and otherwise infringing products from entering or exiting the United States for registered trademark or copyright holders who have recorded their trademarks or copyrights with Customs.

U.S. Customs officials may detect infringing merchandise at the time of entry into the United States. When you record trademarks or copyrights with Customs, the information is entered into an electronic database accessible to U.S. Customs officers around the world. U.S. Customs uses this information to target suspect shipments for the purpose of physically examining merchandise which ultimately prevents the importation or exportation of infringing goods.

Advantages to Recording a Trademark or Copyright with Customs

The first and most obvious advantage to recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs is that the agency will monitor and seize infringing merchandise at the ports of entry. Because U.S. […]

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