9801.00.10: Updated Requirements for Returned Goods

Background on HTSUS Subheading 9801.00.10

Ever hear of U.S. goods returned and wondered what it really meant? The Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (“HTSUS”) subheading 9801.00.10 is used for re-importing U.S. made products back into the United States, duty-free. Previously, this classification only covered merchandise originally made in the United States and now reentering the country (hence “US Goods Returned”). In order to qualify for classification under subheading 9801.00.10 and duty-free treatment, these products entering the United States had to be unimproved in condition or value. In other words, the products had to not be subject to further processing abroad. For example, subheading 9801.00.10 may be used when goods are being re-imported as returned product to the seller or for repair. Under subheading 9801.00.10, the importer has the burden to prove their claim for duty-free treatment.

CBP Issues Updated Guidance

On August 20, 2021, subheading 9801.00.10 was expanded to include products which originated from foreign countries. HTSUS subheading 9801.00.10 now states: “Products of the United States when returned after having been exported, or any other products when returned within 3 years after having been exported, without having been advanced in value or improved in condition by any process of manufacture or other means while abroad.” In other words, non-U.S. origin products that are returned to the United States will ALSO qualify for duty-free treatment under subheading 9801.00.10. However, the timing requirements for U.S.-origin and foreign-origin products are different. U.S.-origin products currently have no time limit to file […]

OFAC Targets Russian Crypto Platform

Treasury’s Ransomware Advisory

Recent administrations have rightfully been concerned about ransomware. Ransomware is a form of malware used to extort users – the software locks your device and then demands a ransom for its release. Ransomware attacks are increasing in scale, sophistication, and frequency, victimizing governments, individuals, and private companies around the world. In 2020, ransomware payments reached over $400 million, more than four times their level in 2019. The U.S. government estimates that these payments represent just a fraction of the economic harm caused by cyber-attacks, but they underscore the objectives of those who seek to weaponize technology for personal gain.

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Customs and Trade Law Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) 

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Trading in Wildlife? You May Need a License

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (“CITES”) is an international agreement that strives to ensure that international trade in wild animals and plants does not threaten the survival of those species. CITES was adopted by 80 countries in 1973. The text of the agreement provides for various measures to prevent the illicit trade in goods made of endangered species. Specifically, CITES imposes controls on all import, export, re-export, and introduction from the sea, of species covered by the agreement, to be authorized through a licensing system. The species that fall within the scope of CITES are listed and maintained in three appendices based on the degree of protection required.

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Why China’s Cryptocurrency Miners are Moving to Texas

In May 2021, China announced a crackdown on cryptocurrency mining and trading. In recent months, China has doubled down on its new policy by targeting businesses involved in the mining and trading of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. China’s is prohibiting cryptocurrency mining and trading for many reasons, including:

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Customs Issues Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Broker Continuing Education – Comments Open

CBP’s Proposed Rule

On September 10, 2021, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding broker continuing education. In the proposed rule, CBP is proposing mandatory continuing education requirements for individual licensed brokers. CBP underscores the benefits of mandatory continuing education for customs brokers in its proposed rule:

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Want Your 301 Exclusion Back? Comment Now!

Source: USTR

USTR Proposes Reinstating Exclusions

On October 6, 2021, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) announced in the Federal Register that the agency is considering a possible reinstatement of 549 EXCLUSIONS for Section 301 duties on products imported from China that had expired on December 31, 2020.

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How to Build and Maintain an Effective Import Compliance Plan

CBP enforcement is on the rise.  If your business is importing into the U.S., or wants to start, our one-hour, NEI accredited, webinar on “Building & Maintaining an Effective Import Compliance Plan”  will provide best practices and TOP tips to build an import compliance plan.

Register today to to hear directly from Senior Trade Advisor, Don Woods, DTL’s president, Jennifer Diaz, and Associate Attorney, Denise Calle as they discuss real life stories, current trends/risks associated with the import process, proactive ways to stay compliant, and the importance of training to avoid costly encounters with CBP. […]

Comment Now – CBP Proposed Rule on Country of Origin Determination for Imports under USMCA

Background on CBP Country of Origin Determination and USMCA

All merchandise of foreign origin imported into the United States (U.S.) must generally be marked with its country of origin, and it is subject to a country of origin (COO) determination by CBP. The country of origin of imported goods may be used as a factor to determine eligibility for preferential trade treatment under a free trade agreement.

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Keysight Technologies Pays $6.6M to State Department for Export Violations

The U.S. Department of State and the California-based company Keysight Technologies Inc. have reached a settlement of $6.6 million for violations of the Arms Export Control Act (AECA), 22 U.S.C. § 2751 et seq., and the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), 22 C.F.R. Parts 120-130.  This settlement comes after a compliance review by the Office of Defense Trade Controls Compliance (DDTC) in the Department’s Bureau of Political-Military Affairs for exporting unauthorized software used for testing radar equipment (on fixed or mobile platforms) to countries including Russia and China.

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