Bloomberg: What is an Importer’s ‘Reasonable Care’ Standard?

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz, is enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles, “What is an Importer’s ‘Reasonable Care’ Standard“! We want to thank law student Isha C. Biswas for her amazing support in getting this article to the finish line!

Many mistake the ease of importing to mean there is no liability or obligation on the part of the importer. In our perfect world this article would be required reading PRIOR to importing where importers would learn about their OBLIGATION to use reasonable care when importing, and actually learn what reasonable care means. This article digs in and gives away TONS of practical guidance. Below is the article reproduced with permission for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love to hear your feedback and urge you to SHARE with importers!!

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By |2022-05-10T12:41:41-04:00May 10, 2022|Bloomberg, Bloomberg Import, Import, International Law, International Trade, Reasonable Care|Comments Off on Bloomberg: What is an Importer’s ‘Reasonable Care’ Standard?

Big News! 352 of 549 Proposed China Tariff Exclusions Reinstated

On March 23, 2022, the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) announced that 352 of the 549 proposed exclusions have been reinstated. The reinstated product exclusions will apply as of October 12, 2021, and extend through December 31, 2022. For a full list of reinstated exclusions, please see this Federal Register announcement.

On October 8, 2021, USTR invited comments on whether to reinstate 549 previously granted and extended exclusions. This recent determination was a result of USTR’s review of public comments regarding whether and which of the proposed exclusions should be reinstated.

Diaz Trade Law filed comments on behalf of several clients who have had their exclusions reinstated. Are your products on the list of exclusions that were reinstated? Do you have questions about navigating Section 301 China tariffs? We are here for you! Diaz Trade Law has significant experience working on Section 301 exclusions. Contact us today at info@diaztradelaw.com.

 

A list of all the exclusions can be found below:

A. Effective with respect to good entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for
consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on October 12, 2021, and before
11:59 p.m. eastern daylight time on December 31, 2022, subchapter III of chapter 99 of the
Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) is modified:
1. by inserting the following new heading 9903.88.67 in numerical sequence, with the
material in the new heading inserted in the columns of the HTSUS labeled
“Heading/Subheading”, “Article Description”, and “Rates of Duty 1-General”,
respectively:
Heading/Subheading: 9903.88.67

Article Description: Effective with respect to entries on or after
October 12, […]

By |2022-03-28T10:37:08-04:00March 23, 2022|301 INVESTIGATIONS, ACE, China, China Trade War, Import, Reasonable Care, Trade Policy, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Trade Representative (USTR)|Comments Off on Big News! 352 of 549 Proposed China Tariff Exclusions Reinstated

Importing into Puerto Rico? Don’t Forget about Paying Use Tax

Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, although uniquely situated as a part of the customs territory of the United States it simultaneously operates its own internal tax system for importations into Puerto Rico. This means importations of goods into Puerto Rico must meet all import requirements that any importation into the United States must meet. For example, importations are subject to duties, taxes, and fees imposed by CBP, and importations must meet the health, safety, and sanitary and phytosanitary requirements of a wide range of federal agencies such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, etc.

Meanwhile, importations into Puerto Rico are additionally subject to the territory’s own entry tax administered by the Departmento de Hacienda (“Hacienda”), a Puerto Rican governmental agency that serves the function of a territory treasury department. Puerto Rico’s unique entry tax is a component of a two-pronged tax system for goods, known as the Impuesto sobre Ventas y Uso (“IVU”) (in English, “Sales and Use Tax”). As the name suggests, the IVU is comprised of (1) sales tax, and (2) a use tax.

The sales tax functions similar to sales taxes elsewhere in the United States. In Puerto Rico, the Hacienda requires that sales taxes on goods and services be collected by goods and services providers and paid to the Hacienda on a monthly basis. On the other hand, the use tax is the amount that a party must pay when introducing an item to […]

By |2022-01-28T15:32:48-05:00February 1, 2022|AD/CVD, Best Practices, Enforcement, Import, International Trade, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on Importing into Puerto Rico? Don’t Forget about Paying Use Tax

Want Customs to Police Your IPR at all 328 Ports of Entry?

Did you know in FY2020, U.S. Customs seized more than 26,000 shipments worth more than $1.3 BILLION due to alleged intellectual property rights (IPR) violations? Ensure you’re on the right side of CBP enforcement and register for Diaz Trade Law’s next webinar Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) and Customs (Including an Update on the Amazon Registry) – Amazon Brand Registry taking place on December 15, 2021. This one-hour webinar will provide best practices and TOP tips on how one can protect their IPR using U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and effective methods to go after IPR infringers.

Register today to hear directly from DTL’s president, Jennifer Diaz, Associate Attorney, Denise Calle and Of Counsel and IPR Specialist, Augusto Perera, as they teach attendees about intellectual property rights and the best ways to protect them.

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By |2021-12-13T16:55:43-05:00December 13, 2021|Best Practices, Counterfeits, Import, International Law, International Trade, IPR, Trademarks and Logos, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, Seizures, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on Want Customs to Police Your IPR at all 328 Ports of Entry?

9801.00.10: Updated Requirements for Returned Goods

Background on HTSUS Subheading 9801.00.10

Ever hear of U.S. goods returned and wondered what it really meant? The Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (“HTSUS”) subheading 9801.00.10 is used for re-importing U.S. made products back into the United States, duty-free. Previously, this classification only covered merchandise originally made in the United States and now reentering the country (hence “US Goods Returned”). In order to qualify for classification under subheading 9801.00.10 and duty-free treatment, these products entering the United States had to be unimproved in condition or value. In other words, the products had to not be subject to further processing abroad. For example, subheading 9801.00.10 may be used when goods are being re-imported as returned product to the seller or for repair. Under subheading 9801.00.10, the importer has the burden to prove their claim for duty-free treatment.

CBP Issues Updated Guidance

On August 20, 2021, subheading 9801.00.10 was expanded to include products which originated from foreign countries. HTSUS subheading 9801.00.10 now states: “Products of the United States when returned after having been exported, or any other products when returned within 3 years after having been exported, without having been advanced in value or improved in condition by any process of manufacture or other means while abroad.” In other words, non-U.S. origin products that are returned to the United States will ALSO qualify for duty-free treatment under subheading 9801.00.10. However, the timing requirements for U.S.-origin and foreign-origin products are different. U.S.-origin products currently have no time limit to file […]

By |2021-11-09T12:23:27-05:00November 23, 2021|ACE, Best Practices, Customs Broker, Customs Expert, Enforcement, Import, International Trade, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on 9801.00.10: Updated Requirements for Returned Goods

Trading in Wildlife? You May Need a License

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (“CITES”) is an international agreement that strives to ensure that international trade in wild animals and plants does not threaten the survival of those species. CITES was adopted by 80 countries in 1973. The text of the agreement provides for various measures to prevent the illicit trade in goods made of endangered species. Specifically, CITES imposes controls on all import, export, re-export, and introduction from the sea, of species covered by the agreement, to be authorized through a licensing system. The species that fall within the scope of CITES are listed and maintained in three appendices based on the degree of protection required.

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By |2021-10-26T12:23:00-04:00October 26, 2021|Import, International Trade, Penalty, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, Supply Chain, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)|Comments Off on Trading in Wildlife? You May Need a License

How to Build and Maintain an Effective Import Compliance Plan

CBP enforcement is on the rise.  If your business is importing into the U.S., or wants to start, our one-hour, NEI accredited, webinar on “Building & Maintaining an Effective Import Compliance Plan”  will provide best practices and TOP tips to build an import compliance plan.

Register today to to hear directly from Senior Trade Advisor, Don Woods, DTL’s president, Jennifer Diaz, and Associate Attorney, Denise Calle as they discuss real life stories, current trends/risks associated with the import process, proactive ways to stay compliant, and the importance of training to avoid costly encounters with CBP. […]

Comment Now – CBP Proposed Rule on Country of Origin Determination for Imports under USMCA

Background on CBP Country of Origin Determination and USMCA

All merchandise of foreign origin imported into the United States (U.S.) must generally be marked with its country of origin, and it is subject to a country of origin (COO) determination by CBP. The country of origin of imported goods may be used as a factor to determine eligibility for preferential trade treatment under a free trade agreement.

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By |2021-10-07T14:33:42-04:00September 21, 2021|AD/CVD, Canada, Customs Broker, Import, International Law, International Trade, Mexico, NAFTA, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), USMCA|Comments Off on Comment Now – CBP Proposed Rule on Country of Origin Determination for Imports under USMCA

Customs Valuation 101

What is Valuation and Why Does it Matter? Customs Valuation is a procedure to determine the customs value of imported goods. The customs value is essential to calculate the total duty to be paid on an imported good. Because there was a need for the international community to have a standardized system for valuing imports, many nations became signatories to a World Trade Organization (“WTO”) agreement that established valuation norms known as the Tokyo Round Valuation Code (later amended into the WTO Agreement on Implementation of Article VII of the GATT 1994).

The United States was a signatory to these treaties and currently maintains and enforces a rigorous valuation system. The U.S. Customs valuation methodology (as well as a summary of relevant Customs rulings) are described in detail in the Valuation Encyclopedia. A common customs valuation standard is important because it ensures that:

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Jennifer Diaz Presenting at Global Trade Educational Conference 2021

The NCBFAA Educational Institute invites all global logistics professionals to its 7th Annual Global Trade Educational Conference (GTEC). This two-day event in  Baltimore, MD will give customs brokers, freight forwarders, NVOCCs, OTI, service providers, importers, exporters and all global logistics professionals an opportunity to update themselves on industry developments and connect with colleagues new and old.

Join us IN PERSON in Baltimore, MD, July 26-27, 2021. NCBFAA NEI and hotel staff will be complying with all state and venue COVID-19 protocols so you can feel safe attending the event! Virtual attendance is available, so you can gain knowledge from anywhere!

REGISTER TODAY!

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