Catch Up on All DTL Blogs from 2021

We want to make sure you stay up to date with the hottest trade blogs from 2021. Below is a summary of what you missed by category. Enjoy! […]

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

CBP 

  • In Fiscal Year 2021, CBP at the LA/Long Beach Seaport seized More Than $760 Million in Counterfeit and Prohibited Products, a 652% increase over the previous year.
  • CBP issues guidance regarding the extension of product exclusions from additional Section 301 China duties on certain medical-care products to address COVID-19.
  • With changes to the HTSUS classification systems possibly coming as early as January 1, 2021, U.S. importers should review their classifications and ensure compliance with U.S. regulations

BIS

China

Want Customs to Police Your IPR at all 328 Ports of Entry?

Did you know in FY2020, U.S. Customs seized more than 26,000 shipments worth more than $1.3 BILLION due to alleged intellectual property rights (IPR) violations? Ensure you’re on the right side of CBP enforcement and register for Diaz Trade Law’s next webinar Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) and Customs (Including an Update on the Amazon Registry) – Amazon Brand Registry taking place on December 15, 2021. This one-hour webinar will provide best practices and TOP tips on how one can protect their IPR using U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and effective methods to go after IPR infringers.

Register today to hear directly from DTL’s president, Jennifer Diaz, Associate Attorney, Denise Calle and Of Counsel and IPR Specialist, Augusto Perera, as they teach attendees about intellectual property rights and the best ways to protect them.

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9801.00.10: Updated Requirements for Returned Goods

Background on HTSUS Subheading 9801.00.10

Ever hear of U.S. goods returned and wondered what it really meant? The Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (“HTSUS”) subheading 9801.00.10 is used for re-importing U.S. made products back into the United States, duty-free. Previously, this classification only covered merchandise originally made in the United States and now reentering the country (hence “US Goods Returned”). In order to qualify for classification under subheading 9801.00.10 and duty-free treatment, these products entering the United States had to be unimproved in condition or value. In other words, the products had to not be subject to further processing abroad. For example, subheading 9801.00.10 may be used when goods are being re-imported as returned product to the seller or for repair. Under subheading 9801.00.10, the importer has the burden to prove their claim for duty-free treatment.

CBP Issues Updated Guidance

On August 20, 2021, subheading 9801.00.10 was expanded to include products which originated from foreign countries. HTSUS subheading 9801.00.10 now states: “Products of the United States when returned after having been exported, or any other products when returned within 3 years after having been exported, without having been advanced in value or improved in condition by any process of manufacture or other means while abroad.” In other words, non-U.S. origin products that are returned to the United States will ALSO qualify for duty-free treatment under subheading 9801.00.10. However, the timing requirements for U.S.-origin and foreign-origin products are different. U.S.-origin products currently have no time limit to file […]

OFAC Targets Russian Crypto Platform

Treasury’s Ransomware Advisory

Recent administrations have rightfully been concerned about ransomware. Ransomware is a form of malware used to extort users – the software locks your device and then demands a ransom for its release. Ransomware attacks are increasing in scale, sophistication, and frequency, victimizing governments, individuals, and private companies around the world. In 2020, ransomware payments reached over $400 million, more than four times their level in 2019. The U.S. government estimates that these payments represent just a fraction of the economic harm caused by cyber-attacks, but they underscore the objectives of those who seek to weaponize technology for personal gain.

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Trading in Wildlife? You May Need a License

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (“CITES”) is an international agreement that strives to ensure that international trade in wild animals and plants does not threaten the survival of those species. CITES was adopted by 80 countries in 1973. The text of the agreement provides for various measures to prevent the illicit trade in goods made of endangered species. Specifically, CITES imposes controls on all import, export, re-export, and introduction from the sea, of species covered by the agreement, to be authorized through a licensing system. The species that fall within the scope of CITES are listed and maintained in three appendices based on the degree of protection required.

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Customs Issues Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Broker Continuing Education – Comments Open

CBP’s Proposed Rule

On September 10, 2021, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding broker continuing education. In the proposed rule, CBP is proposing mandatory continuing education requirements for individual licensed brokers. CBP underscores the benefits of mandatory continuing education for customs brokers in its proposed rule:

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Customs Classification – A Key Component of an Import Compliance Manual

We are often asked by importers to assist in classifying their products under the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the U.S. (“HTS” or “HTSUS”). While seeking assistance from expert counsel is a best practice, under the CBP Modernization Act, an importer of record (“IOR”) is the sole party responsible for determining the correct classification of imported goods (and thereby paying the correct amount of customs duties). An IOR must use reasonable care in classifying its product at the time of entry. Should an importer misclassify their products and not pay the appropriate duties to CBP at the time of importation; the importer is exposing itself to potential CBP penalties under 19 U.S.C. 1592.  The process of classifying goods can be a tedious process and may require time and research to arrive at the correct HTSUS number for any one product.

This blog expands our prior blog, Crash Course in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States, and provides additional detail on the classification process and tips for importers to use when deciding on a classification its customs broker will declare to CBP.  Importers are encouraged to attend the webinar How to Build and Maintain an Effective Import Compliance Plan on October 6, 2021 (and on-demand) for best practices on how to build and maintain an import compliance plan by addressing common risks associated with the import process – including product classification.

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How to Build and Maintain an Effective Import Compliance Plan

CBP enforcement is on the rise.  If your business is importing into the U.S., or wants to start, our one-hour, NEI accredited, webinar on “Building & Maintaining an Effective Import Compliance Plan”  will provide best practices and TOP tips to build an import compliance plan.

Register today to to hear directly from Senior Trade Advisor, Don Woods, DTL’s president, Jennifer Diaz, and Associate Attorney, Denise Calle as they discuss real life stories, current trends/risks associated with the import process, proactive ways to stay compliant, and the importance of training to avoid costly encounters with CBP. […]

FDA Seeks Public Comments on Proposed Final Order for OTC Sunscreen Safety

FDA is proposing to amend the Over-the-Counter (OTC) Monograph which covers sunscreen drug products for OTC human use. The public has until November 12, 2021 to submit comments on the impact the proposed changes may have on consumers and industry. This blog provides background on why FDA is considering such changes and discusses FDA’s newly deemed final order for OTC sunscreens as well as the changes included in the proposed order for sunscreens. Industry is encouraged to contact Diaz Trade Law to assess the implications of the proposed changes on its products and to assist in drafting and submitting comments to FDA.

Why is FDA Taking New Steps to Enhance Sunscreen Safety?

The 2020 Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act reformed and modernized the way FDA regulates certain OTC monograph drugs, including sunscreen.

The CARES Act replaced the rulemaking process for OTC monograph drugs with an administrative order process for issuing, revising, and amending the OTC monographs.  The administrative order process gives FDA new tools to help revise the OTC monographs as science changes, innovation progresses, new data becomes available, or emerging safety signals arise.

For sunscreens specifically, in addition to establishing a deemed final order, the CARES Act requires FDA to issue a proposed order to amend and revise the deemed final order for sunscreens. The FDA believes that most sunscreens on the market will be in compliance with the deemed final order because the provisions are nearly identical to the pre-CARES Act marketing conditions for sunscreens.

As background, an OTC […]

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