International Trade Today: CBP Policy Change Makes Extensions for Prior Disclosures More Difficult

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz is enthusiastic to announce International Trade Today featured her perspective in their recent article, “CBP Policy Change Makes Extensions for Prior Disclosures More Difficult, Lawyer Says“! Below is the article reproduced for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access the link to the CBP guidance).

A previous article written by Jen and Sharath focuses on how to successfully submit a prior disclosure (PD) to Customs and Border Protection, along with details known of CBP’s new timing requirements, which had not been circulated publicly (prior to our FOIA request). We truly feel CBP’s new deadlines place a burden on importers that must be considered PRIOR to filing a PD. If you are considering filing a Prior Disclosure – PLEASE communicate with counsel first.

Please note you cannot click on the hyperlink below. We’d love to hear your feedback!

 

 

 

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Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA): What You Need to Know

Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) and What You Need to Know?

On June 16, 2022, CBP held a webinar on the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA). The UFLPA goes into effect June 21, 2022 so it is critical that importers are proactive about forced labor compliance in preparation for this implementation. During the webinar CBP discussed their recently published operational guidance for importers. This blog article provides an overview of CBP’s current enforcement environment and how UFLPA will change CBP’s enforcement procedures for imports generally, and specifically from the Xinjiang region. For general guidance on preventing the importation of goods produced with forced labor and how importers should audit their supply chain to ensure non-use of forced labor, please refer to our Bloomberg Law article, “U.S. Customs Targets Use of Forced Labor”.

Background

Under Section 307 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1307), CBP derives the authority for preventing the entry into the U.S. market of products made with forced labor by investigating and acting upon allegations of forced labor in supply chains. CBP issues Withhold Release Orders (WROs) and findings to prevent merchandise produced in whole or in part in a foreign country using forced labor from being imported into the United States. CBP defines Forced labor as all work or service which is extracted from any person under the menace of any penalty for its nonperformance and for which the worker does not […]

CBP’s NEW Prior Disclosure Requirements

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz, and Associate Attorney, Sharath Patil, are enthusiastic to announce that our article, “New CBP Prior Disclosure Requirements” was published by the Customs and International Trade Bar Association (CITBA) in its Spring 2022 newsletter.

Our article focuses on how to successfully submit a prior disclosure (PD) to Customs and Border Protection, along with details known of CBP’s new timing requirements, which have not been circulated publicly. CBP’s new deadlines place a burden on importers that must be considered PRIOR to filing a PD.

You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love your feedback!

Below is the article for your reading pleasure.

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By |2022-04-21T14:11:35-04:00April 19, 2022|Best Practices, Import, International Law, International Trade, Pre-compliance, Prior Disclosures, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on CBP’s NEW Prior Disclosure Requirements

Importing into Puerto Rico? Don’t Forget about Paying Use Tax

Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, although uniquely situated as a part of the customs territory of the United States it simultaneously operates its own internal tax system for importations into Puerto Rico. This means importations of goods into Puerto Rico must meet all import requirements that any importation into the United States must meet. For example, importations are subject to duties, taxes, and fees imposed by CBP, and importations must meet the health, safety, and sanitary and phytosanitary requirements of a wide range of federal agencies such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, etc.

Meanwhile, importations into Puerto Rico are additionally subject to the territory’s own entry tax administered by the Departmento de Hacienda (“Hacienda”), a Puerto Rican governmental agency that serves the function of a territory treasury department. Puerto Rico’s unique entry tax is a component of a two-pronged tax system for goods, known as the Impuesto sobre Ventas y Uso (“IVU”) (in English, “Sales and Use Tax”). As the name suggests, the IVU is comprised of (1) sales tax, and (2) a use tax.

The sales tax functions similar to sales taxes elsewhere in the United States. In Puerto Rico, the Hacienda requires that sales taxes on goods and services be collected by goods and services providers and paid to the Hacienda on a monthly basis. On the other hand, the use tax is the amount that a party must pay when introducing an item to […]

By |2022-01-28T15:32:48-05:00February 1, 2022|AD/CVD, Best Practices, Enforcement, Import, International Trade, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on Importing into Puerto Rico? Don’t Forget about Paying Use Tax

Catch Up on All DTL Blogs from 2021

We want to make sure you stay up to date with the hottest trade blogs from 2021. Below is a summary of what you missed by category. Enjoy! […]

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

CBP 

  • In Fiscal Year 2021, CBP at the LA/Long Beach Seaport seized More Than $760 Million in Counterfeit and Prohibited Products, a 652% increase over the previous year.
  • CBP issues guidance regarding the extension of product exclusions from additional Section 301 China duties on certain medical-care products to address COVID-19.
  • With changes to the HTSUS classification systems possibly coming as early as January 1, 2021, U.S. importers should review their classifications and ensure compliance with U.S. regulations

BIS

China

Want Customs to Police Your IPR at all 328 Ports of Entry?

Did you know in FY2020, U.S. Customs seized more than 26,000 shipments worth more than $1.3 BILLION due to alleged intellectual property rights (IPR) violations? Ensure you’re on the right side of CBP enforcement and register for Diaz Trade Law’s next webinar Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) and Customs (Including an Update on the Amazon Registry) – Amazon Brand Registry taking place on December 15, 2021. This one-hour webinar will provide best practices and TOP tips on how one can protect their IPR using U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and effective methods to go after IPR infringers.

Register today to hear directly from DTL’s president, Jennifer Diaz, Associate Attorney, Denise Calle and Of Counsel and IPR Specialist, Augusto Perera, as they teach attendees about intellectual property rights and the best ways to protect them.

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By |2021-12-13T16:55:43-05:00December 13, 2021|Best Practices, Counterfeits, Import, International Law, International Trade, IPR, Trademarks and Logos, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, Seizures, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on Want Customs to Police Your IPR at all 328 Ports of Entry?

9801.00.10: Updated Requirements for Returned Goods

Background on HTSUS Subheading 9801.00.10

Ever hear of U.S. goods returned and wondered what it really meant? The Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (“HTSUS”) subheading 9801.00.10 is used for re-importing U.S. made products back into the United States, duty-free. Previously, this classification only covered merchandise originally made in the United States and now reentering the country (hence “US Goods Returned”). In order to qualify for classification under subheading 9801.00.10 and duty-free treatment, these products entering the United States had to be unimproved in condition or value. In other words, the products had to not be subject to further processing abroad. For example, subheading 9801.00.10 may be used when goods are being re-imported as returned product to the seller or for repair. Under subheading 9801.00.10, the importer has the burden to prove their claim for duty-free treatment.

CBP Issues Updated Guidance

On August 20, 2021, subheading 9801.00.10 was expanded to include products which originated from foreign countries. HTSUS subheading 9801.00.10 now states: “Products of the United States when returned after having been exported, or any other products when returned within 3 years after having been exported, without having been advanced in value or improved in condition by any process of manufacture or other means while abroad.” In other words, non-U.S. origin products that are returned to the United States will ALSO qualify for duty-free treatment under subheading 9801.00.10. However, the timing requirements for U.S.-origin and foreign-origin products are different. U.S.-origin products currently have no time limit to file […]

By |2021-11-09T12:23:27-05:00November 23, 2021|ACE, Best Practices, Customs Broker, Customs Expert, Enforcement, Import, International Trade, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on 9801.00.10: Updated Requirements for Returned Goods

OFAC Targets Russian Crypto Platform

Treasury’s Ransomware Advisory

Recent administrations have rightfully been concerned about ransomware. Ransomware is a form of malware used to extort users – the software locks your device and then demands a ransom for its release. Ransomware attacks are increasing in scale, sophistication, and frequency, victimizing governments, individuals, and private companies around the world. In 2020, ransomware payments reached over $400 million, more than four times their level in 2019. The U.S. government estimates that these payments represent just a fraction of the economic harm caused by cyber-attacks, but they underscore the objectives of those who seek to weaponize technology for personal gain.

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By |2021-11-04T15:48:52-04:00November 16, 2021|International Trade, Pre-compliance, Trade Policy, U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)|Comments Off on OFAC Targets Russian Crypto Platform

Trading in Wildlife? You May Need a License

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (“CITES”) is an international agreement that strives to ensure that international trade in wild animals and plants does not threaten the survival of those species. CITES was adopted by 80 countries in 1973. The text of the agreement provides for various measures to prevent the illicit trade in goods made of endangered species. Specifically, CITES imposes controls on all import, export, re-export, and introduction from the sea, of species covered by the agreement, to be authorized through a licensing system. The species that fall within the scope of CITES are listed and maintained in three appendices based on the degree of protection required.

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By |2021-10-26T12:23:00-04:00October 26, 2021|Import, International Trade, Penalty, Pre-compliance, Reasonable Care, Supply Chain, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS)|Comments Off on Trading in Wildlife? You May Need a License
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