Upcoming Deadline to File Comments: USTRs Section 301 China Tariff Exclusions Proceeding

On December 26, 2023, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (“USTR”) announced that it will extend 352 reinstated exclusions and 77 COVID-related exclusions on goods from China until May 31, 2024.

The exclusions refer to additional duties imposed on goods from China pursuant to an earlier Section 301 investigation of China’s acts, policies, and practices related to technology transfer, intellectual property, and innovation.

In December 2022, the agency determined to extend the exclusions and extended them again in May 2023 and September 2023 through December 31, 2023. This latest Federal Register notice announces the agency’s determination to further extend the exclusions until May 31, 2024 and open up the ability to comment on the exclusions. The public docket will open on January 22, 2024 and will close on February 21, 2024.

This latest extension provides USTR additional time to orderly phase out certain exclusions and align others with the objectives determined during the agency’s ongoing four-year review of Section 301 China tariffs.

The agency also announced that it will open a docket to gather public comments on whether to further extend particular exclusions. The focus of the evaluation will be on:

  • The availability of products covered by the exclusion from sources outside China
  • Efforts undertaken to source products covered by the exclusion
  • Why additional time is needed
  • On what timeline, if any, the sourcing of products covered by the exclusion is likely to shift outside of China

USTR will also consider whether or not extending the exclusion will impact U.S. interests.

 Exclusion Background

In […]

By |2024-01-15T20:21:09-05:00January 5, 2024|China, Import, Special 301, U.S. Trade Representative (USTR)|Comments Off on Upcoming Deadline to File Comments: USTRs Section 301 China Tariff Exclusions Proceeding

Trade News: New Petition Filed on Glass Wine Bottles from China, Mexico and Chile

On December 29, 2023, the last working day of the year, the U.S. Glass Producers Coalition filed a petition for the imposition of antidumping duties on certain glass wine bottles from China, Mexico, and Chile and countervailing duties on imports of certain glass wine bottles from China.

The Coalition is comprised of U.S. producer Ardagh Glass Inc. and the United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (“USW”). The petitions allege that the Chinese, Chilean, and Mexican industries have been dumping wine bottles in the U.S., harming the U.S. market and destroying American jobs.

Full list of producers here. Full list of U.S. importers here.

The petition alleges dumping margins of:

  • China: 280.10% and 620.03%
  • Mexico: 78.55% and 102.09%
  • Chile: 615.68%

The scope of merchandise covered includes a wide array of products including both clear and colored bottles in the Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, or Sparkling shapes. Full scope here.

The Commerce Department will determine whether to initiate the investigations within 20 days. The USITC will reach a preliminary determination of material injury or threat of material injury within 45 days. Final determinations will likely occur late 2024.

As with any proceeding, participation is very important to protect your rights. We urge anyone that imports glass wine bottles to pay close attention to this case and to ensure that all appropriate steps are taken to mitigate any damage.

Diaz Trade Law will continue to monitor this case and share updates. For more information or questions get in touch […]

By |2024-01-05T15:52:11-05:00January 5, 2024|AD/CVD, China, Import, Mexico, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)|Comments Off on Trade News: New Petition Filed on Glass Wine Bottles from China, Mexico and Chile

Summary of CBP’s March 2023 Forced Labor Technical Expo

Summary of CBP’s March 2023 Forced Labor Technical Expo 

CBP held a Forced Labor Technical Expo from March 14-15, comprised of experts and service providers highlighting tools to utilize for supply chain transparency to comply with The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) and the general “reasonable care” obligations of U.S. importers. UFLPA was signed into law December 31, 2021, and seeks to prohibit imports of certain goods from China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, where it has been reported that the Chinese government is using forced labor of Uyghur Muslims and other ethnic and religious minorities in detention camps and factories. For more information about the UFLPA, please see our previous blog articles here and here.  

CBP Data Dashboard  

CBP launched a UFLPA data dashboard where the trade community can now monitor forced labor enforcement by origin, commodity, CBP Center of Excellence and Expertise, and more. See the screenshot of the new dashboard below and note that the countries of export most targeted are NOT China, contrary to popular belief. This is partly due to the fact that most UFLPA enforcement to date has been on solar panels, which may include Chinese-origin raw materials but are generally further manufactured outside of China. Notably, CBP is actively tracking many different types of products across many different industries with raw materials that originate in China and that are further manufactured in other countries for forced labor enforcement. […]

By |2023-03-29T12:06:53-04:00March 29, 2023|China, Forced Labor, International Trade, Reasonable Care, Supply Chain, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on Summary of CBP’s March 2023 Forced Labor Technical Expo

New Court Rulings on Marijuana-Related Paraphernalia: Understanding the Impact on Importers

The marijuana industry is rapidly growing, with more and more states legalizing its use for medical and/or recreational purposes. With this growth, there is an increase in the importation of products such as grinders, storage containers, rolling paper, pipes, and vape pens, both for business and personal use. More businesses are asking why there is an issue importing such items when they only intend to sell and distribute within the many states where marijuana is legal for medical or recreational use and have established regulations for marijuana-related products. It is still essential to remember, while many states have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use, marijuana remains illegal under federal law. 

This blog will address recent Court of International Trade (CIT) cases on this very topic and will be a part 2 to our previous blog covering U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) seizures of drug paraphernalia 

CBP Authority 

CBP has the power to seize “drug paraphernalia” products.  This does not only cover importations of products for commercial use, but also items for personal use with individuals traveling internationally seeking entry into the United States.  CBP’s website section: Know Before You Go – Prohibited and Restricted Items encourages individuals to contact CBP prior to traveling and make sure that prohibited or restricted items, such as drug paraphernalia, are not brought into the country, as they are not only subject to seizure pursuant to 19 […]

By |2023-03-10T12:04:07-05:00March 10, 2023|E-Cigarette, Export, Import, Seizures, Tobacco, U.S. Court of International Trade, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on New Court Rulings on Marijuana-Related Paraphernalia: Understanding the Impact on Importers

CBP Publishes Additional Guidance On Responding to Cargo Detentions Made Under the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act

Background

The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (“UFLPA”) went into effect on June 21, 2022. The law creates a rebuttable presumption that imports of all goods mined, produced, or manufactured wholly or in part in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China (“Xinjiang”), or by entities identified on the UFLPA Entity List, were made using forced labor and are prohibited from entry into the U.S. under 19 U.S.C. § 1307. For more information about the UFLPA, please see our previous blog articles here and here. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) has been vigorously enforcing this law, detaining hundreds of attempted import shipments every month under both the UFLPA and Withhold Release Orders for suspected forced labor violations.

Importers that have a shipment detained under the UFLPA can seek to have the shipment released under one of two paths. They can either:

  • show that in spite of the fact that the goods were produced wholly or partially in Xinjiang or by an entity on the UFLPA Entity List, they were not in fact made using forced labor; or
  • show that neither the goods nor the inputs used to make the goods were produced wholly or partially in Xinjiang and have no connection to entities on the UFLPA Entity List (i.e., that the goods fall outside the scope of the UFLPA).

Taking the second path means requesting an “admissibility review.”

Last year, pursuant to the UFLPA, the Department of Homeland Security published a Strategy to Prevent the Importation of Goods Mined, […]

By |2023-03-09T20:19:21-05:00March 9, 2023|China, Forced Labor, Import, International Trade, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Uncategorized|Comments Off on CBP Publishes Additional Guidance On Responding to Cargo Detentions Made Under the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act

Omnibus Bill: What Changes Can You Expect to Cosmetics Regulation?

On December 22, 2022, U.S. House and Senate leaders passed the long-awaited $1.7 trillion FY2023 omnibus spending bill. This blog provides information on the significant changes to cosmetics regulation with the passage of the Omnibus bill and the Food Drug and Cosmetic Act amendments. We encourage you to contact Diaz Trade Law to assess the implications of the significant changes.  […]

By |2023-01-06T11:31:44-05:00January 6, 2023|Best Practices, Cosmetics, Import, International Trade, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)|Comments Off on Omnibus Bill: What Changes Can You Expect to Cosmetics Regulation?

2022: A Year in Review

From all of us at Diaz Trade Law, we are immensely grateful for your support this year. While returning to a new normal post-pandemic, Diaz Trade Law still managed to save our clients MILLIONS of dollars in 2022. It is with great joy that we finish off 2022 filled with numerous achievements and accomplishments we are humbled to share with you. We look forward to assisting you in what we envision will be a better and brighter 2023!

Below we share some of our top 2022 success stories with you.

[…]

The Beginning of the End of the MID

The Global Business Identifier Evaluative Proof of Concept (GBI EPoC) is officially out and open for participation by entry filers (i.e., importers of record and licensed customs brokers who file type 1 & 11 entries) and it has very specific parameters. I was very excited to see that CBP was looking to end MID’s and get the data elsewhere – now we know more about the who and the why. I consider this the beginning of the end of MID’s with an extra layer of snooping for targeting data. Below identified the who, what, and when.

[…]

By |2022-12-12T23:50:49-05:00December 13, 2022|Best Practices, Import, International Trade, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on The Beginning of the End of the MID

Customs Bulletin Weekly, Vol. 56, November 16, 2022, No. 45

Below is a recap for this week’s Customs Bulletin.

  • African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) Textile Certificate of Origin
    • The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) was adopted by the U.S. with the enactment of the Trade and Development Act of 2000 (Pub. L. 106–200). The objectives of AGOA are (1) to provide for extension of duty-free treatment under the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) to import sensitive articles normally excluded from GSP duty treatment, and (2) to provide for the entry of specific textile and apparel articles free of duty and free of any quantitative limits from eligible countries of sub-Saharan Africa.
    • For preferential treatment of textile and apparel articles under AGOA, the exporter or producer is required to prepare a certificate of origin and provide it to the importer. The certificate of origin includes information such as name and address of the exporter, producer, and importer; the basis for which preferential treatment is claimed; and a description of the imported article(s). The importers are required to have the certificate in their possession at the time of the claim, and to provide it to Customs and Border Protection (CBP) upon request. The collection of this information is provided for in 19 CFR 10.214, 10.215, and 10.216.
    • CBP invites the general public and other Federal agencies to comment on the proposed and/or continuing information collections pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). This proposed information collection was previously published in the Federal Register […]
By |2022-11-17T09:53:38-05:00November 21, 2022|COVID-19, Federal Register, Import, International Business, International Law, International Trade, U.S. Court of International Trade, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Uncategorized|Comments Off on Customs Bulletin Weekly, Vol. 56, November 16, 2022, No. 45
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