Understanding the RPL Export License Exception

U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to U.S. export control laws, including the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”). Administered by the U.S. Commerce Department, the EAR is a set of regulations which governs whether U.S. persons may export or transfer goods, software, and technology outside of the United States or to non-U.S. citizens. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to the EAR. Violations of the EAR carry hefty civil and criminal penalties. Exporters can pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in penalties, lose export privileges, and even be imprisoned.

Licensing Exception for “Servicing and Replacement of Parts and Equipment” (RPL)

An export license under the EAR is not necessary if the License Exception for “Servicing and Replacement of Parts and Equipment” (“RPL”) applies. License Exception RPL is described under Part 740.10 of the EAR. RPL is known as a transaction-based exception because the availability/applicability of the exception is based on the terms of the transaction.

According to BIS guidance, the RPL License Exception may be used for the two following scenarios:

  • Replacement Parts – This authorizes the export and reexport of replacement parts for the immediate repair of previously exported, reexported or foreign made equipment incorporating U.S. origin parts on a one-for-one replacement basis. It also authorizes the export and reexport of stock spare parts that were authorized to accompany the export of equipment.
  • Servicing and Replacement – Replacements for defective or unacceptable U.S.-origin equipment. (a) The commodity or software to be replaced must have been […]

Encryption Controls under the Export Administration Regulations

Encryption is generally defined as the process of converting information or data into a code, especially to prevent unauthorized access. Put simply, encryption makes a wide range of technologies more secure. Since 1996, most encrypted technology is controlled by the EAR. Some encrypted technology, which has military-related functionalities, is controlled by the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (“ITAR”). This article provides an overview of encryption controls under the EAR, outlines license exceptions for certain encrypted technologies, and provides best practices for export compliance.

Background on Export Administration Regulations

Over 95% of the world’s population is outside of the United States. Opportunities abound for U.S. companies that export. However, exporting is a privilege and not a right. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to U.S. export control laws, including the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”).

Administered by the U.S. Commerce Department, the EAR is a set of regulations which governs whether U.S. persons may export or transfer goods, software, and technology outside of the United States or to non-U.S. citizens. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to the EAR. Violations of the EAR carry hefty civil and criminal penalties. Exporters can pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in penalties, lose export privileges, and even be imprisoned.

Encryption Controls

According to 15 CFR 742.15:

“Encryption items can be used to maintain the secrecy of information, and thereby may be used by persons abroad to harm U.S. national security, foreign policy and law enforcement interests. The United States has a critical interest in ensuring that […]

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

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Export Filing Requirements for Puerto Rico & the U.S. Virgin Islands

Did you know that shipments from the 50 U.S. states to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands generally requires an Electronic Export Information (“EEI”) filing under the U.S. Census Bureau’s Foreign Trade Regulations? This article provides an overview of Foreign Trade Regulations export filing requirements generally, outlines the requirements for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, and outlines what you can do to optimize your export compliance.

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By |2022-07-07T12:52:42-04:00January 11, 2022|EAR, EEI, Export, International Trade, ITAR, U.S. Census Bureau|Comments Off on Export Filing Requirements for Puerto Rico & the U.S. Virgin Islands

Bloomberg Law – Introduction to U.S. Export Controls: Part 2

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz,  and Associate Attorney, Sharath Patil, are enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles, “Introduction to US Export Controls Part 2“! Below is the article reproduced with permission for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love to hear your feedback!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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By |2022-04-25T16:52:06-04:00December 7, 2021|Best Practices, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Export, EAR, EEI, Export, International Law, International Trade, ITAR, U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)|Comments Off on Bloomberg Law – Introduction to U.S. Export Controls: Part 2

What are Routed Export Transactions?

The U.S. Census Bureau requires Routed Export Transactions to be accurately reported in the Electronic Export Information (“EEI”) that is filed for certain export shipments. This article provides an overview of the U.S. Census Bureau’s export filing requirements, an explanation of what a Routed Export Transaction is, an outline of the Census Bureau’s policies pertaining to Routed Export Transactions, specifically, and offers insight into what you should do to be proactive about your export compliance.

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Understanding the GOV Export License Exception

Background on Export Administration Regulations

Over 95% of the world’s consumers are outside of the United States. Opportunities abound for U.S. companies that export. However, exporting is a privilege and not a right. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to U.S. export control laws, including the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”).

Administered by the U.S. Commerce Department, the EAR is a set of regulations which governs whether U.S. persons may export or transfer goods, software, and technology outside of the United States or to non-U.S. citizens. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to the EAR. Violations of the EAR carry hefty civil and criminal penalties. Exporters can pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in penalties, lose export privileges, and even be imprisoned.

[…]

By |2021-10-07T14:37:05-04:00August 24, 2021|Best Practices, EAR, EEI, Export, International Trade, U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)|Comments Off on Understanding the GOV Export License Exception

Understanding the Computer Export License Exception (APP)

Background on Export Administration Regulations

 Over 95% of the world’s consumers are outside of the United States. Opportunities abound for U.S. companies that export. However, exporting is a privilege and not a right. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to U.S. export control laws, including the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”).

Administered by the U.S. Commerce Department, the EAR is a set of regulations which governs whether U.S. persons may export or transfer goods, software, and technology outside of the United States or to non-U.S. citizens. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to the EAR. Violations of the EAR carry hefty civil and criminal penalties. Exporters can pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in penalties, lose export privileges, and even be imprisoned.

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Vegas Woman Charged with Iran Sanctions Violations

A Las Vegas woman has been indicted by a federal grand jury for conspiracy to export goods from the United States to Iran, in violation of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (IEEPA) and the Iranian Transactions and Sanctions Regulations. According to the indictment unsealed recently, Tina Chen, 47 — aka Ya When Chen, Wen Tina Chen, Tina Dunbar, and Tina Dubner — is the owner of Top One Zone, LLC, a company exporting electronic and computer components that Chen operates from her residence. As alleged, from about November 2015 to May 2019, Chen conspired with others to buy and export goods from companies in the United States, and then send those goods to individuals in Iran through companies in Hong Kong. Chen concealed the identities of the end users, and she did not have a license from OFAC. Chen is charged with one count of conspiracy to unlawfully export goods to Iran.

According to the allegations in the indictment, Chen engaged in numerous overt acts of conspiracy including:

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By |2021-10-07T14:41:14-04:00July 23, 2021|EAR, EEI, Export, International Trade, IRAN, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC), U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)|Comments Off on Vegas Woman Charged with Iran Sanctions Violations

Do’s and Don’ts of Filing a Commodity Jurisdiction Request

An Introduction to Export Controls

Over 95% of the world’s consumers are outside of the United States. Opportunities abound for U.S. companies that export. However, exporting is a privilege and not a right. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to U.S. export control laws, including the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”), and the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (“ITAR”). Violations of export control laws carry hefty civil and criminal penalties. Exporters can pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in penalties, lose export privileges, and even be imprisoned for violations of U.S. export control laws.

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By |2021-10-07T14:45:48-04:00June 22, 2021|China, Cuba, EAR, EEI, Export, International Trade, IRAN, ITAR, U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC), U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), venezuela|Comments Off on Do’s and Don’ts of Filing a Commodity Jurisdiction Request
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