Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

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Export Controls & Cybersecurity

Introduction

In order to protect U.S. national security interests and promote foreign policy objectives, various U.S. agencies collectively administer and enforce U.S. export control laws and participate in various multilateral export control regimes to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and prevent destabilizing accumulations of conventional weapons and related materials. To that end, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) governs the export and reexport of commodities, software, and technology falling under the jurisdiction of Export Administration Regulations. BIS promotes continued U.S. strategic technology leadership and is responsible for enforcing the regulation of export, reexport, and transfer of items with commercial uses that can also have a dual use, and be used in conventional arms, weapons of mass destruction, terrorist activities, or human rights abuses, and less sensitive military items, which bleeds into cybersecurity as well.

Cybersecurity has recently become an essential aspect in export controls and on October 21, 2021, BIS published its Interim Final Rule (this rule is effective January 19, 2022), which summary states:

SUMMARY: This interim final rule outlines the progress the United States has made in export controls pertaining to cybersecurity items, revised Commerce Control List (CCL) implementation, and requests from the public information about the impact of these revised controls on U.S. industry and the cybersecurity community. Specifically, this rule establishes a new control on these items for National Security (NS) and Anti-terrorism (AT) reasons, along with a new License Exception Authorized Cybersecurity Exports (ACE) that authorizes exports of […]

By |2022-02-15T13:12:15-05:00February 15, 2022|ACE, EAR, Enforcement, Export, International Trade, U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS)|Comments Off on Export Controls & Cybersecurity

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

[…]

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

BIS 

  • On January 14, 2022, the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) issued a notice of information collection regarding a Defense Production Act requirement for U.S. firms to furnish information to the agency regarding offset agreements exceeding $5,000,000 in value associated with sales of weapon systems or defense related items to foreign countries or foreign firms. BIS is soliciting public comments to help evaluate if the proposed information collection is necessary for the proper functions of the Commerce Department, evaluate the accuracy of their estimate of time and cost burden, evaluate ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected, and to minimize the reporting burden.
    • Comments are due no later than March 15, 2022.

CBP 

DOT 

  • On January 13, 2022, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration […]

Export Licensing Under EAR

 

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz,  and Associate Attorney, Sharath Patil, are enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles, “Export Licensing Under EAR“! Below is the article reproduced with permission for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love to hear your feedback!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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By |2022-04-25T16:53:46-04:00January 4, 2022|Best Practices, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Export, EAR, Export, International Trade, ITAR, U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS)|Comments Off on Export Licensing Under EAR

Catch Up on All DTL Blogs from 2021

We want to make sure you stay up to date with the hottest trade blogs from 2021. Below is a summary of what you missed by category. Enjoy! […]

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

CBP 

  • In Fiscal Year 2021, CBP at the LA/Long Beach Seaport seized More Than $760 Million in Counterfeit and Prohibited Products, a 652% increase over the previous year.
  • CBP issues guidance regarding the extension of product exclusions from additional Section 301 China duties on certain medical-care products to address COVID-19.
  • With changes to the HTSUS classification systems possibly coming as early as January 1, 2021, U.S. importers should review their classifications and ensure compliance with U.S. regulations

BIS

China

Bloomberg Law – Introduction to U.S. Export Controls: Part 2

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz,  and Associate Attorney, Sharath Patil, are enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles, “Introduction to US Export Controls Part 2“! Below is the article reproduced with permission for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love to hear your feedback!

 

 

 

 

 

 

[…]

By |2022-04-25T16:52:06-04:00December 7, 2021|Best Practices, Bloomberg, Bloomberg Export, EAR, EEI, Export, International Law, International Trade, ITAR, U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)|Comments Off on Bloomberg Law – Introduction to U.S. Export Controls: Part 2

What are Routed Export Transactions?

The U.S. Census Bureau requires Routed Export Transactions to be accurately reported in the Electronic Export Information (“EEI”) that is filed for certain export shipments. This article provides an overview of the U.S. Census Bureau’s export filing requirements, an explanation of what a Routed Export Transaction is, an outline of the Census Bureau’s policies pertaining to Routed Export Transactions, specifically, and offers insight into what you should do to be proactive about your export compliance.

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