Breaking Trade News: New AD and CVD Petition Filed on Paper Plates from China, Vietnam and Thailand

The Petition, filed on behalf of the American Paper Plate Coalition (the “APPC”), concerns certain paper plates that are imported from China, Thailand, and Vietnam. APPC is comprised of six producers of paper plates in the United States:

  • AJM Packaging Corporation
  • Dart Container Corporation
  • Aspen Products, Inc.
  • Huhtamaki Americas, Inc.
  • 9201 Packaging Drive
  • Unique Industries, Inc.

The petition claims the paper plates were sold at less than fair value, and that certain paper plates from China and Vietnam benefit from countervailable subsidies. Petitioners claim that these imports have caused material injury and threaten additional material injury to the domestic industry producing paper plates.

Full list of producers here. Full list of U.S. importers here.

The proposed scope language is broad and includes “Paper plates, which may be white, colored, and/or printed, and if printed, may be printed and/or laminated by any means with images, text and/or colors on one or both surfaces.” Full description and scope here.

The Commerce Department will determine whether to initiate the investigations within 20 days. The USITC will reach a preliminary determination of material injury or threat of material injury within 45 days. Final determinations will likely occur late 2024.

As with any proceeding, participation is very important to protect your rights. We urge anyone that imports paper plates to pay close attention to this case and to ensure that all appropriate steps are taken to mitigate any damage.

Diaz Trade Law will continue to monitor this case and share updates. For more information or questions get […]

By |2024-01-29T12:29:29-05:00January 25, 2024|AD/CVD, China, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)|Comments Off on Breaking Trade News: New AD and CVD Petition Filed on Paper Plates from China, Vietnam and Thailand

Trade News: New Petition Filed on Glass Wine Bottles from China, Mexico and Chile

On December 29, 2023, the last working day of the year, the U.S. Glass Producers Coalition filed a petition for the imposition of antidumping duties on certain glass wine bottles from China, Mexico, and Chile and countervailing duties on imports of certain glass wine bottles from China.

The Coalition is comprised of U.S. producer Ardagh Glass Inc. and the United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (“USW”). The petitions allege that the Chinese, Chilean, and Mexican industries have been dumping wine bottles in the U.S., harming the U.S. market and destroying American jobs.

Full list of producers here. Full list of U.S. importers here.

The petition alleges dumping margins of:

  • China: 280.10% and 620.03%
  • Mexico: 78.55% and 102.09%
  • Chile: 615.68%

The scope of merchandise covered includes a wide array of products including both clear and colored bottles in the Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, or Sparkling shapes. Full scope here.

The Commerce Department will determine whether to initiate the investigations within 20 days. The USITC will reach a preliminary determination of material injury or threat of material injury within 45 days. Final determinations will likely occur late 2024.

As with any proceeding, participation is very important to protect your rights. We urge anyone that imports glass wine bottles to pay close attention to this case and to ensure that all appropriate steps are taken to mitigate any damage.

Diaz Trade Law will continue to monitor this case and share updates. For more information or questions get in touch […]

By |2024-01-05T15:52:11-05:00January 5, 2024|AD/CVD, China, Import, Mexico, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)|Comments Off on Trade News: New Petition Filed on Glass Wine Bottles from China, Mexico and Chile

2022: A Year in Review

From all of us at Diaz Trade Law, we are immensely grateful for your support this year. While returning to a new normal post-pandemic, Diaz Trade Law still managed to save our clients MILLIONS of dollars in 2022. It is with great joy that we finish off 2022 filled with numerous achievements and accomplishments we are humbled to share with you. We look forward to assisting you in what we envision will be a better and brighter 2023!

Below we share some of our top 2022 success stories with you.

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Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

Customs Bulletin Weekly, Vol. 56, November 2, 2022, No. 43

Below is a recap for this week’s Custom’s Bulletin.

  • Elimination of Customs Broker District Permit Fee
    • Section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1641), provides that individuals and business entities must hold a valid customs broker’s license and permit to transact customs business on behalf of others. The statute also sets forth standards for the issuance of broker licenses and permits; provides for disciplinary action against brokers in the form of suspension or revocation of such licenses and permits or assessment of monetary penalties; and, provides for the assessment of monetary penalties against other persons for conducting customs business without the required broker’s license.
    • On June 5, 2020, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register (85 FR 34549), proposing the elimination of customs broker district permit fees in parts 24 and 111.
    • Consistent with the June 5, 2020, notice, CBP is publishing a final rule to, among other things, eliminate customs broker districts (see ‘‘Modernization of the Customs Broker Regulations’’ RIN 1651–AB16). Specifically, CBP is transitioning all brokers to national permits and expanding the scope of the national permit authority to allow national permit holders to conduct any type of customs business throughout the customs territory of the United States. As a result of the elimination of customs broker districts, CBP is amending in this document the regulations to eliminate customs broker district permit fees.
  • Modernization of the Customs Broker Regulations
    • This document adopts […]

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

Customs Bulletin Weekly, Vol. 56, October 26, 2022, No. 42

Below is a recap for this week’s Custom’s Bulletin.

  • Period of Admission and Extensions of Stay for Representatives of Foreign Information Media Seeking to Enter the United States
    • This rule amends Department of Homeland Security (DHS) regulations to better facilitate the U.S. Government’s ability to achieve greater reciprocity between the United States and the People’s Republic of China (PRC) relative to the treatment of representatives of foreign information media of the respective countries seeking entry into the other country.
    • For entry into the United States, such foreign nationals would seek to be admitted in I nonimmigrant status as bona fide representatives of foreign information media. Currently, foreign nationals who present a passport issued by the PRC, with the exception of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) or Macau SAR passport holders, may be admitted in or otherwise granted I nonimmigrant status until the activities or assignments consistent with the I classification are completed, not to exceed 90 days.
    • This rule amends the DHS regulations to remove the set period of stay of up to 90 days and to allow the Secretary of Homeland Security (Secretary) to determine the maximum period of stay, no longer than one year, for PRC I visa holders, taking into account certain factors.
    • This rule also announces the Secretary has determined the maximum period of stay for which a noncitizen who presents a passport issued by the PRC (other than a Hong Kong SAR passport or a Macau SAR passport) may be admitted in or […]
By |2022-10-27T09:51:20-04:00October 31, 2022|AD/CVD, Federal Register, Import, International Law, International Trade, U.S. Court of International Trade, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)|Comments Off on Customs Bulletin Weekly, Vol. 56, October 26, 2022, No. 42

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

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