Trade News: New Petition Filed Against Tungsten Shot from China

Tungsten Parts Wyoming, Inc. filed the petition for the imposition of antidumping and countervailing (AD/CVD) duties on the imports of tungsten shot from China.

Unlike most AD/CVD petitions, the domestic industry has not yet been established, as the petitioner only began production last year. Thus, instead of arguing that Chinese imports are injuring the industry, the petitioner is claiming that the domestic industry has been “materially retarded” by reason of the allegedly unfair Chinese imports.

Full list of exporters. Full list of importers.

Background on AD/CVD Investigations

Antidumping duty (“AD”) and countervailing duty (“CVD”) investigations are brought jointly by the U.S. International Trade Commission (“USITC”) and the U.S. Department of Commerce (“Commerce”). AD investigations are triggered when a domestic industry alleges that it has been injured by competing imports of particular goods from specific countries being sold at less than a fair value. Meanwhile, CVD investigations are triggered when a domestic industry alleges that it has been injured by competing imports that are being unfairly subsidized by their governments. 

Scope of the Investigation

This investigation pertains to certain tungsten shot. The physical characteristics of the covered product are tungsten shot that are 92.6 percent or greater tungsten by weight. Merchandise is covered regardless of the combination of compounds that comprise the non-tungsten material and whether or not the tungsten shot is additionally coated with another material, including but not limited […]

DHS Announces New High Priority Sectors for UFLPA Enforcement

The Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force (FLETF) released an update to the Strategy to Prevent the Importation of Goods Mined, Produced, or Manufactured with Forced Labor in the People’s Republic of China.

Strategy Background

DHS released the first publication of the UFLPA Strategy in June 2022. The strategy outlines a multi-pronged approach to combating forced labor in global supply chains.The strategy includes a comprehensive assessment of the risk of importing goods with forced labor in the PRC, high priority sectors for enforcement, guidance to importers, recommendations to accurately identify affected goods, and more. DHS released the first update to the publication in August of 2023.

The Latest Update  

The update builds on two years of the Administration’s enforcement of the UFLPA. The latest strategy identified new high priority sectors for enforcement – aluminum, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and seafood. These industries were identified due to higher risk of forced labor or state labor transfer of Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities from the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR).

Entities in these sectors will now be prioritized for review for enforcement actions such as inclusion on the UFLPA Entity List, sanctions, export limitations, and visa restrictions.

Other products previously identified as high priority such as apparel, cotton and cotton products, silica-based products including polysilicon, and tomatoes remain high priority sectors.

The latest updates also outline how the FLETF has significantly advanced their objectives through several initiatives, such as strong enforcement by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP); expansion of the UFLPA Entity List; […]

Trade News: New Petition Filed on Alkyl Phosphate Esters from China

A petition was filed on April 23, 2024 that alleges alkyl phosphate esters from China are being sold at less than fair value and benefiting from countervailing subsidies. The petition was filed by ICL-IP America, Inc., a subsidiary of the ICL Group (“ICL”). Alleged dumping margins range from 45.1% to 68.4%.

Full list of producers here. Full list of U.S. importers here.

The scope of petition covers alkyl phosphate esters based exclusively on side chains with a length of two or three carbon atoms and a phosphorus content of at least 6.5 percent (per weight) and a viscosity between 1 and 2000 mPa.s (at 20-25 °C).  Full scope here.

The Commerce Department will determine whether to initiate the investigations within 20 days. The USITC will reach a preliminary determination of material injury or threat of material injury within 45 days.

As with any proceeding, participation is very important to protect your rights. We urge anyone that imports alkyl phosphate esters to pay close attention to this case and to ensure that all appropriate steps are taken to mitigate any damage.

Diaz Trade Law will continue to monitor this case and share updates. For more information or questions get in touch with us at 305-456-3830 or info@diaztradelaw.com.

By |2024-04-24T11:38:59-04:00April 24, 2024|AD/CVD, China, Countries, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)|Comments Off on Trade News: New Petition Filed on Alkyl Phosphate Esters from China

Breaking Trade News: New AD and CVD Petition Filed on Paper Plates from China, Vietnam and Thailand

The Petition, filed on behalf of the American Paper Plate Coalition (the “APPC”), concerns certain paper plates that are imported from China, Thailand, and Vietnam. APPC is comprised of six producers of paper plates in the United States:

  • AJM Packaging Corporation
  • Dart Container Corporation
  • Aspen Products, Inc.
  • Huhtamaki Americas, Inc.
  • 9201 Packaging Drive
  • Unique Industries, Inc.

The petition claims the paper plates were sold at less than fair value, and that certain paper plates from China and Vietnam benefit from countervailable subsidies. Petitioners claim that these imports have caused material injury and threaten additional material injury to the domestic industry producing paper plates.

Full list of producers here. Full list of U.S. importers here.

The proposed scope language is broad and includes “Paper plates, which may be white, colored, and/or printed, and if printed, may be printed and/or laminated by any means with images, text and/or colors on one or both surfaces.” Full description and scope here.

The Commerce Department will determine whether to initiate the investigations within 20 days. The USITC will reach a preliminary determination of material injury or threat of material injury within 45 days. Final determinations will likely occur late 2024.

As with any proceeding, participation is very important to protect your rights. We urge anyone that imports paper plates to pay close attention to this case and to ensure that all appropriate steps are taken to mitigate any damage.

Diaz Trade Law will continue to monitor this case and share updates. For more information or questions get […]

By |2024-01-29T12:29:29-05:00January 25, 2024|AD/CVD, China, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)|Comments Off on Breaking Trade News: New AD and CVD Petition Filed on Paper Plates from China, Vietnam and Thailand

Upcoming Deadline to File Comments: USTRs Section 301 China Tariff Exclusions Proceeding

On December 26, 2023, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (“USTR”) announced that it will extend 352 reinstated exclusions and 77 COVID-related exclusions on goods from China until May 31, 2024.

The exclusions refer to additional duties imposed on goods from China pursuant to an earlier Section 301 investigation of China’s acts, policies, and practices related to technology transfer, intellectual property, and innovation.

In December 2022, the agency determined to extend the exclusions and extended them again in May 2023 and September 2023 through December 31, 2023. This latest Federal Register notice announces the agency’s determination to further extend the exclusions until May 31, 2024 and open up the ability to comment on the exclusions. The public docket will open on January 22, 2024 and will close on February 21, 2024.

This latest extension provides USTR additional time to orderly phase out certain exclusions and align others with the objectives determined during the agency’s ongoing four-year review of Section 301 China tariffs.

The agency also announced that it will open a docket to gather public comments on whether to further extend particular exclusions. The focus of the evaluation will be on:

  • The availability of products covered by the exclusion from sources outside China
  • Efforts undertaken to source products covered by the exclusion
  • Why additional time is needed
  • On what timeline, if any, the sourcing of products covered by the exclusion is likely to shift outside of China

USTR will also consider whether or not extending the exclusion will impact U.S. interests.

 Exclusion Background

In […]

By |2024-01-15T20:21:09-05:00January 5, 2024|China, Import, Special 301, U.S. Trade Representative (USTR)|Comments Off on Upcoming Deadline to File Comments: USTRs Section 301 China Tariff Exclusions Proceeding

Trade News: New Petition Filed on Glass Wine Bottles from China, Mexico and Chile

On December 29, 2023, the last working day of the year, the U.S. Glass Producers Coalition filed a petition for the imposition of antidumping duties on certain glass wine bottles from China, Mexico, and Chile and countervailing duties on imports of certain glass wine bottles from China.

The Coalition is comprised of U.S. producer Ardagh Glass Inc. and the United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (“USW”). The petitions allege that the Chinese, Chilean, and Mexican industries have been dumping wine bottles in the U.S., harming the U.S. market and destroying American jobs.

Full list of producers here. Full list of U.S. importers here.

The petition alleges dumping margins of:

  • China: 280.10% and 620.03%
  • Mexico: 78.55% and 102.09%
  • Chile: 615.68%

The scope of merchandise covered includes a wide array of products including both clear and colored bottles in the Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, or Sparkling shapes. Full scope here.

The Commerce Department will determine whether to initiate the investigations within 20 days. The USITC will reach a preliminary determination of material injury or threat of material injury within 45 days. Final determinations will likely occur late 2024.

As with any proceeding, participation is very important to protect your rights. We urge anyone that imports glass wine bottles to pay close attention to this case and to ensure that all appropriate steps are taken to mitigate any damage.

Diaz Trade Law will continue to monitor this case and share updates. For more information or questions get in touch […]

By |2024-01-05T15:52:11-05:00January 5, 2024|AD/CVD, China, Import, Mexico, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)|Comments Off on Trade News: New Petition Filed on Glass Wine Bottles from China, Mexico and Chile

DHS Adds Ninestar Co. And Xinjiang Zhongtai Chemical Co. to the UFLPA Entity List

The interagency Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force (FLETF), led by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), added the following two People’s Republic of China (PRC)-based companies to the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) Entity List: Ninestar Co. and Xinjiang Zhongtai Chemical Co. DHS found that the companies engaged in business practices that target members of persecuted groups, including Uyghur minorities. Goods produced by the companies  will be restricted from entering the United States.

UFLPA Background

On December 23, 2021, President Biden signed into law H.R. 6256, as part of the United States’ commitment and deterrence efforts to secure U.S. supply chains from goods produced by forced labor. The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act  (UFLPA) (H.R. 6256) requires CBP to apply a rebuttable presumption that all imports of goods, wares, articles, and merchandise manufactured wholly or in part from the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous region of the People’s Republic of China, or by entities identified by the U.S. government on the UFLPA Entity List, are presumed to be produced with forced labor and are prohibited from entry into the United States.

This presumption applies to all goods made in, or shipped through, other countries that include parts made in Xinjiang. However, this presumption is rebuttable. To rebut this presumption, the importer of record will need to provide to CBP clear and convincing evidence that the goods were NOT produced using forced labor.

DHS Making Progress, Some Say Not Enough

While the announcement was applauded by some, other groups expressed concern that DHS is […]

By |2023-06-30T11:11:22-04:00June 30, 2023|China, Countries, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)|Comments Off on DHS Adds Ninestar Co. And Xinjiang Zhongtai Chemical Co. to the UFLPA Entity List

Summary of CBP’s March 2023 Forced Labor Technical Expo

Summary of CBP’s March 2023 Forced Labor Technical Expo 

CBP held a Forced Labor Technical Expo from March 14-15, comprised of experts and service providers highlighting tools to utilize for supply chain transparency to comply with The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) and the general “reasonable care” obligations of U.S. importers. UFLPA was signed into law December 31, 2021, and seeks to prohibit imports of certain goods from China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, where it has been reported that the Chinese government is using forced labor of Uyghur Muslims and other ethnic and religious minorities in detention camps and factories. For more information about the UFLPA, please see our previous blog articles here and here.  

CBP Data Dashboard  

CBP launched a UFLPA data dashboard where the trade community can now monitor forced labor enforcement by origin, commodity, CBP Center of Excellence and Expertise, and more. See the screenshot of the new dashboard below and note that the countries of export most targeted are NOT China, contrary to popular belief. This is partly due to the fact that most UFLPA enforcement to date has been on solar panels, which may include Chinese-origin raw materials but are generally further manufactured outside of China. Notably, CBP is actively tracking many different types of products across many different industries with raw materials that originate in China and that are further manufactured in other countries for forced labor enforcement. […]

By |2023-03-29T12:06:53-04:00March 29, 2023|China, Forced Labor, International Trade, Reasonable Care, Supply Chain, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)|Comments Off on Summary of CBP’s March 2023 Forced Labor Technical Expo

CBP Publishes Additional Guidance On Responding to Cargo Detentions Made Under the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act

Background

The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (“UFLPA”) went into effect on June 21, 2022. The law creates a rebuttable presumption that imports of all goods mined, produced, or manufactured wholly or in part in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China (“Xinjiang”), or by entities identified on the UFLPA Entity List, were made using forced labor and are prohibited from entry into the U.S. under 19 U.S.C. § 1307. For more information about the UFLPA, please see our previous blog articles here and here. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) has been vigorously enforcing this law, detaining hundreds of attempted import shipments every month under both the UFLPA and Withhold Release Orders for suspected forced labor violations.

Importers that have a shipment detained under the UFLPA can seek to have the shipment released under one of two paths. They can either:

  • show that in spite of the fact that the goods were produced wholly or partially in Xinjiang or by an entity on the UFLPA Entity List, they were not in fact made using forced labor; or
  • show that neither the goods nor the inputs used to make the goods were produced wholly or partially in Xinjiang and have no connection to entities on the UFLPA Entity List (i.e., that the goods fall outside the scope of the UFLPA).

Taking the second path means requesting an “admissibility review.”

Last year, pursuant to the UFLPA, the Department of Homeland Security published a Strategy to Prevent the Importation of Goods Mined, […]

By |2023-03-09T20:19:21-05:00March 9, 2023|China, Forced Labor, Import, International Trade, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Uncategorized|Comments Off on CBP Publishes Additional Guidance On Responding to Cargo Detentions Made Under the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act
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