Customs Issues Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Broker Continuing Education – Comments Open

CBP’s Proposed Rule

On September 10, 2021, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding broker continuing education. In the proposed rule, CBP is proposing mandatory continuing education requirements for individual licensed brokers. CBP underscores the benefits of mandatory continuing education for customs brokers in its proposed rule:

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How to Build and Maintain an Effective Import Compliance Plan

CBP enforcement is on the rise.  If your business is importing into the U.S., or wants to start, our one-hour, NEI accredited, webinar on “Building & Maintaining an Effective Import Compliance Plan”  will provide best practices and TOP tips to build an import compliance plan.

Register today to to hear directly from Senior Trade Advisor, Don Woods, DTL’s president, Jennifer Diaz, and Associate Attorney, Denise Calle as they discuss real life stories, current trends/risks associated with the import process, proactive ways to stay compliant, and the importance of training to avoid costly encounters with CBP. […]

Jennifer Diaz Presenting at Global Trade Educational Conference 2021

The NCBFAA Educational Institute invites all global logistics professionals to its 7th Annual Global Trade Educational Conference (GTEC). This two-day event in  Baltimore, MD will give customs brokers, freight forwarders, NVOCCs, OTI, service providers, importers, exporters and all global logistics professionals an opportunity to update themselves on industry developments and connect with colleagues new and old.

Join us IN PERSON in Baltimore, MD, July 26-27, 2021. NCBFAA NEI and hotel staff will be complying with all state and venue COVID-19 protocols so you can feel safe attending the event! Virtual attendance is available, so you can gain knowledge from anywhere!

REGISTER TODAY!

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Potential Relief from China Tariffs Coming

Background on Section 301 Tariffs

A key element of the U.S.-China trade war, initiated under the Trump administration and continuing through Biden’s first term, was the imposition of China tariffs under Section 301. Section 301 is a mechanism via which the President can retaliate against foreign countries that violate U.S. trade agreements or engage in acts that are “unjustifiable” or “unreasonable” and burden U.S. commerce. With regard to China, the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) found that China’s acts, policies, and practices related to intellectual property and innovation are unreasonable or discriminatory and burden or restrict U.S. commerce. Accordingly, a broad set of tariffs were instituted. Section 301 tariffs for goods originating from China have been so expansive that U.S. Customs revenue has nearly doubled from $41.6 billion in FY 2018 to $71.9 billion in FY 2019 and $74.4 billion in FY 2020.

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ACE: Auditing Your Export History

If a company or individual believes they have violated export control regulations and the U.S. government is unaware of this violation, proactively and voluntarily disclosing the potential wrongdoing can substantially reduce penalties. A key component of filing a successful voluntary self-disclosure (“VSD”) is uncovering and providing the correct data. Diaz Trade Law has significant experience analyzing ACE export data to evaluate your export compliance and submit successful VSDs that substantially mitigate penalties.

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ACE: Auditing Your Import History

In FY 2020 alone, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) import audits resulted in over $44.6 million being collected by CBP. Similarly, CBP collected over $20.1 million in FY 2020 from trade-related penalties and liquidated damages. Prior to CBP auditing you, there is a lot you can do to be proactive about import compliance. The first step is getting a clear picture of your imports by accessing and analyzing your import data on the Automated Commercial Environment (“ACE”). An ACE  audit can identify duty-saving opportunities and open risks.

To date, CBP has collected $87.8 billion in China 301 tariffs. If you have paid Section 301 China tariffs on Lists 3 and 4 and you have joined the landmark lawsuit demanding full refunds on these tariffs paid, it is critical that you understand the extent of China tariffs that you have paid, and proactively look out for liquidations. Proactively and comprehensively auditing your ACE import data is the first step.

Whether you are new to importing or a seasoned professional, this one-hour webinar is a must attend. Register today to hear directly from our Diaz Trade Law President Jennifer (Jen) Diaz about audit risks and duty-saving opportunities. Jen is a Chambers ranked, Board Certified International Attorney specializing in customs and international trade.

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REGISTER TODAY! NEI Accredited Webinar Importing 101 – Introduction to U.S. Customs

Webinar Importing 101 Introduction to US CustomsWhether you are new to importing or seasoned, this one-hour webinar is a must attend. Register today to hear directly from this specialized, expert trio on the “Top 10 Tips When Importing to Ensure Compliance” with real case studies:

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Fifth Round of 301 Product Exclusions Involving List 4A – $300B

On June 23, 2020, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) issued Cargo Systems Messaging Service (CSMS) #43134617 as guidance on the fifth round of product exclusions for List 4A of the Section 301 trade remedies. These exclusions were announced in Federal Register Notice (FRN) 85 FR 35975.

According to the CSMS, duty exclusions granted by the USTR under this exclusion are retroactive for imports on or after the initial effective date of September 1, 2019.  To request a refund of Section 301 duties paid on previous imports of products granted duty exclusions by the USTR, importers may file a Post Summary Correction (PSC) if within the PSC filing time frame. If the entry is beyond the PSC filing time frame, importers may protest the liquidation if within the protest filing time frame. These exclusions will be available through September 1, 2020 under 9903.88.49.

The following chart details exclusions per Tranche as well as provides the secondary HTSUS that should be used by importers when filing entry with CBP. The secondary HTSUS signals to CBP the merchandise is excluded from the applicable Tranche.   

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