Customs Bulletin Weekly, Vol. 56, October 26, 2022, No. 42

Below is a recap for this week’s Custom’s Bulletin.

  • Period of Admission and Extensions of Stay for Representatives of Foreign Information Media Seeking to Enter the United States
    • This rule amends Department of Homeland Security (DHS) regulations to better facilitate the U.S. Government’s ability to achieve greater reciprocity between the United States and the People’s Republic of China (PRC) relative to the treatment of representatives of foreign information media of the respective countries seeking entry into the other country.
    • For entry into the United States, such foreign nationals would seek to be admitted in I nonimmigrant status as bona fide representatives of foreign information media. Currently, foreign nationals who present a passport issued by the PRC, with the exception of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) or Macau SAR passport holders, may be admitted in or otherwise granted I nonimmigrant status until the activities or assignments consistent with the I classification are completed, not to exceed 90 days.
    • This rule amends the DHS regulations to remove the set period of stay of up to 90 days and to allow the Secretary of Homeland Security (Secretary) to determine the maximum period of stay, no longer than one year, for PRC I visa holders, taking into account certain factors.
    • This rule also announces the Secretary has determined the maximum period of stay for which a noncitizen who presents a passport issued by the PRC (other than a Hong Kong SAR passport or a Macau SAR passport) may be admitted in or […]
By |2022-10-27T09:51:20-04:00October 31, 2022|AD/CVD, Federal Register, Import, International Law, International Trade, U.S. Court of International Trade, U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC)|Comments Off on Customs Bulletin Weekly, Vol. 56, October 26, 2022, No. 42

Customs and Weekly Trade Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

Customs Bulletin Update – Vol. 56, October 19, 2022, No. 41

Below is a recap for this week’s Custom’s Bulletin.

  • Revocation of three ruling letters, modification of one ruling letter, and revocation of treatment relating to the tariff classification of certain step stools
    • Pursuant to 19 U.S.C. § 1625(c)(1), CBP is revoking NY N294603, dated March 2, 2018, NY N196451, dated December 27, 2011, NY M84487, dated June 27, 2006, and modifying NY N235681, dated December 5, 2012, and revoking or modifying any other ruling not specifically identified to reflect the analysis contained in HQ H305377, set forth as an Attachment to this notice. Additionally, pursuant to 19 U.S.C. § 1625(c)(2), CBP is revoking any treatment previously accorded by CBP to substantially identical transactions.
    • It is now CBP’s position that a one-step step stool is classified according to its constituent material in heading 3924, if made of plastics or in heading 4421, if made of wood. Accordingly, pursuant to GRI’s 1 and 6, the plastic one-step step stools in NY N294603 and NY N196451 are classified in subheading 3924.90.56, which provides for “Tableware, kitchenware, other household articles and hygienic or toilet articles, of plastics: Other: Other”. The one-step step stool made of MDF in NY N235681 and the wooden step stool in NY M84487 are classified in subheading 4421.99.97, which provides for “Other articles of wood: Other: Other: Other: Other
  • Proposed modification of one ruling letter and proposed revocation of treatment relating to the tariff classification of paper face masks
    • Pursuant to 19 U.S.C. § 1625(c)(1), CBP is proposing to […]
By |2022-10-21T17:24:05-04:00October 24, 2022|CTPAT, Import, International Law, International Trade, IPR, Trademarks and Logos, U.S. Court of International Trade, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Uncategorized|Comments Off on Customs Bulletin Update – Vol. 56, October 19, 2022, No. 41

Customs and Weekly Trade Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

Building & Maintaining an Export Compliance Plan

Diaz Trade Law’s President, Jennifer Diaz, Associate Attorney Sharath Patil, are enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles, “Building & Maintaining an Export Compliance Plan”! We also thank our law clerk, Gabi Perez, for her support with research for this article. Below is the article reproduced with permission for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love to hear your feedback!

 

 

 

[…]

By |2022-11-10T15:44:12-05:00October 18, 2022|Bloomberg, Bloomberg Export, International Law, U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), Uncategorized|Comments Off on Building & Maintaining an Export Compliance Plan

Customs and Weekly Trade Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

Customs and Weekly Trade Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

Customs Undervaluation – It’s a Crime

Customs Valuation is a procedure to determine the customs value of imported goods. The customs value is essential to calculate the total duty to be paid on an imported good. As part of its agreement with the World Trade Organization (“WTO”), the U.S. is part of an internationally standardized system of valuing imports. This standardized system allows for CBP to protect revenue, ensure reasonable care from importers, and accurately calculate Census trade statistics. Accordingly, it is critical to declare the value of importations accurately and compliantly. 

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) valuation methodology (as well as a summary of relevant Customs rulings) are described in detail in the Valuation Encyclopedia (i.e., the best resource on valuation inquiries). CBP permits merchandise to be valued according to one of the six valuation methods listed below. The methods are applied sequentially from first to last until an applicable value is determined. If the first method does not apply, the importer must then evaluate the second, and so on, until an appropriate method applies. The only exception to this sequential evaluation requirement is when evaluating between deductive value and computed value – an importer may choose to use the computed value before the deductive value.

Methods of Valuation:

  1. The transaction value of imported merchandise (the majority of imports use transaction value – i.e., the price paid or payable plus assists (see below))
  2. The transaction value of identical merchandise
  3. The transaction value of similar merchandise
  4. Deductive value
  5. Computed […]
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