Recovering Your Seized Cargo from U.S. Customs

On September 8, 2011, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. EST, the Journal of Commerce will host a webinar entitled "Recovering Your Seized Cargo". The speakers will be Dennis McKenzie, Director, Fines, Penalties, and Forfeitures Division, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Washington, D.C., and Peter Quinter, Partner in Charge, Customs and International Trade Department, Becker & Poliakoff law firm. The panel experts will explain the CBP detention and seizure process, as well as the administrative petition and judicial forfeiture process.

By |2011-08-22T12:33:56-04:00August 22, 2011|Seizures|0 Comments

Food Import Workshop in Miami on September 7

The annual seminar "Practical Tools for Trade in the Food Industry" takes place at the Miami Seaport on September 7, 2011 from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sponsored by the Miami-Dade County Office of Economic Development & International Trade, and supported by the Port of Miami, this year we will again focus on what importers need to know about both U.S. Customs and Border Protection and U.S. Food and Drug Administration requirements. There will be special emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011.

TSA and Pepper Spray – A Story of What NOT to Do

Our beloved Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has the responsibility of screening passengers to "ensure that certain items and persons prohibited from flying don't board commercial airliners." This is accomplished through 43,00 Transportation Security Officers (TSOs) located at 450 airports around the United States. For me, while I am waiting in line to be screened, there seems always to be one energetic TSO screaming at my fellow passengers to take our shoes off, remove most liquids, take our belts off, take out our laptops, etc.. it is hard to remember that the official Mission of the TSA is to "protect the Nation's transportation systems to ensure freedom of movement for people and commerce." I do have one funny story to tell you about the TSA and a certain passenger.

Homeland Security Says U.S. Customs Bonds are Insufficient

The Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued a report criticizing U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). In a June 2011 report entitled "Efficacy of Customs and Border Protection's Bonding Process," DHS concluded that up to $12 billion in single transaction bonds for importers may fail to be collected. Considering that approximately $2 trillion of goods are imported into the United States each year, and that CBP collects about $32 billion in duties, taxes, and fees, $12 billion is a heck of a lot of money to lose.

By |2011-08-13T11:28:23-04:00August 13, 2011|Import|0 Comments
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