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BEWARE – Liquidated Damages WILL be Imposed for 10+2 Violations

posted by Jennifer Diaz July 18, 2013 0 comments

For those who thought CBP’s “measured and commonsense” approach for those that weren’t fully complying with the Importer Security Filing (ISF or 10+2) rules would last forever, think again!

Effective, July 9, 2013, CBP advised it would start the liquidated damages phase of the Importer Security Filing (ISF) enforcement process. CBP will now make use of the newly activated cargo holds in the Automated Cargo Environment (ACE) system to address non-compliance with the ISF rule. CBP may also withhold the release or transfer of non-compliant ISF shipments at the terminal until the required ISF is filed. For carrier violations of the vessel stow plan requirement, CBP may refuse to grant a permit to unlade the merchandise. Once the ISF data is received and a security assessment is made, additional enforcement actions including a Non-Intrusive Inspection (NII) and/or intrusive exams may be initiated.

Liquidated Damages

CBP may also assess liquidated damages of up to $5,000 per violation for the submission of an inaccurate, incomplete or untimely filing. CBP Dec. 09-26 discusses “Guidelines for the Assessment and Cancellation of Claims for Liquidated Damages for Failure to Comply with the Vessel Stow Plan, Container Status Message, and Importer Security Filing Requirements.”  First violations may be mitigated to $1,000-$2,000 – depending on the presence of aggravating or mitigating factors.  Some mitigating factors for the failure to file a complete, accurate and timely ISF include evidence of progress in the implementation of ISF during the “flexible enforcement period,” small number of violations compared to number of shipments, Tier 2 and 3 C-TPAT status, remedial action….  CBP has advised that “no relief will be granted if CBP determines that law enforcement goals were compromised by the violation.”  Aggravating factors include multiple errors on your ISF!  If you do receive a Liquidated Damages claim, it is important you consult with an expert to file a timely, persuasive Petition to CBP and address all relevant mitigating factors to assure you receive the maximum reduction possible.

What’s ISF Again?

The ISF rules require importers and vessel-operating carriers to provide additional advance trade data on cargo shipments to CBP 24 hours prior to vessel lading, pursuant to Section 203 of the Security and Accountability for Every Port (SAFE Port Act) of 2006.

Importers must report the following 10 data elements on each ISF:

  1. Manufacturer (or supplier) name and address
  2. Seller (or owner) name and address
  3. Buyer (or owner) name and address
  4. Ship-to name and address
  5. Container stuffing location
  6. Consolidator (stuffer) name and address
  7. Importer of record number/foreign trade zone applicant identification number
  8. Consignee number(s)
  9. Country of origin
  10. Commodity Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) number

From the carrier, 2 data elements are required:

  1. Vessel stow plan – required for arriving vessels with containers.
  2. Container status messages – required for containers arriving via vessel.

Hence, 10+2!

For shipments consisting entirely of freight remaining on board (FROB) cargo or goods intended to be transported in-bond as an immediate entry or transportation and exportation entry, the following 5 data elements are required:

  1. Booking party name and address
  2. Ship-to name and address
  3. Commodity Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) number
  4. Foreign Port of Unlading
  5. Place of delivery

In order to avoid liquidated damages and untimely delays with your cargo, full ISF compliance is now required.  Since we’re talking compliance, do you have your pre-compliance plan established?  If not… Let’s talk!

If you have any questions on the listed requirements, need assistance with cargo detained as a result of this new enforcement phase, getting your C-TPAT application in ASAP (and getting to Tier 2 quickly!), or any other compliance or enforcement question, please feel free to contact Diaz Trade Law at info@diaztradelaw.com and we would be happy to assist you!

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