CBPCounterfeitsDepartment of Homeland SecurityImportIPR, Trademarks and LogosSeizuresU.S.Customs

31,560 Shipments Were Seized by CBP in 2016 for ONE Reason

posted by Jennifer Diaz March 23, 2017 0 comments

ipr

Last year, on a typical day the U.S. Customs and Border Protections (CBP) seized about $3.8 million worth of products because of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Violations. CBP reported that the total number of IPR seizures has increased nine (9) percent since last year, from 28,865 in 2015 to 31,560 in 2016. With the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) exceeding $1.3 trillion.

What is Causing the Increase in Seizures?

Recordation of Trademark And Copyright With The CBP

In addition to registration of IPR with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO for trademarks), or the U.S. Copyright Office (for copyrights), owners can record said trademark or copyright with CBP. This additional step grants CBP additional enforcement power in both seizing counterfeit and piratical goods as well as thereafter issuing penalties for the MSRP value of the goods. In previous blog posts, we explained benefits of taking the extra step of recording your registered trademark or copyright with CBP, and CBP’s additional enforcement powers as a result of the recordations. Continue Reading

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The Centers For Excellence and Expertise Have Arrived!

posted by Jennifer Diaz March 17, 2017 0 comments

Screen Shot 2017-03-16 at 8.33.06 PMWhat are the Centers for Excellence and Expertise?

CBP is changing how it does business. CBP envisions an end to port shopping and uniform decision making throughout all ports of entry via use of the Centers of Excellence and Expertise (CEE). We previously advised our readers that a CEE was arriving in Miami!

By way of background, in 2012, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) published a Federal Register notice (77 FR 52048) that “developed a test to incrementally transition the operational trade functions that traditionally reside with port directors to the CEE.” The purpose of the test was to expand the CEEs’ ability to make decisions, by allowing the directors of the CEE to make decisions that were normally reserved for port directors. CBP’s goal for the CEEs is to “facilitate trade, reduce transaction costs, increase compliance with applicable port laws, and to achieve uniformity of treatment at the ports of entry for the identified industries (77 FR 52048).”

CBP discussed the application process, and urged importers to apply to a CEE to begin receiving the benefits of being a participating account early.

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CBP’s 2017 West Coast Trade Symposium…Don’t Miss It!

posted by Jennifer Diaz February 20, 2017 4 Comments

west coast trade symposium

UPDATE – CBP JUST ANNOUNCED TODAY that registration will OFFICIALLY open on Wednesday, March 22, 2017, 12:00 pm Eastern. Keep your eyes peeled for more information from CBP!

We always strive to keep you informed of the latest and greatest trade events. In this vain, U.S. Customs and Border Protection will be hosting the 2017 West Coast Trade Symposium from May 24-25 in Scottsdale, Arizona.

More information about the event, including where to register, will be provided at a later date (and will be posted here). You can be sure we’ll keep you in the loop as we hear more.

If you need reasons to attend (or to get your employer to foot the bill), check out these top 5 reasons!

CBPExportImport

Hate Unfair Demurrage Charges? Want to Do Something About it?

posted by Jennifer Diaz February 16, 2017 0 comments

FMC seal

Now’s the time to make your voice heard. Below details what demurrage charges are and a trade initiative that FMC is currently requesting comments on.

What is demurrage?

How Much Time is Provided for Free?

 What is Being Done to Change this Demurrage Fee?

  • Back in December, “the Coalition for Fair Port Practices, a group of 25 members that represent shippers, receivers, motor carriers, port draymen, freight forwarders, third-party logistics companies and customs brokers”, petitioned the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) in hopes that the FMC would issue a ruling on extending the free time for container storage and equipment use that is disrupted by events outside of their control. Such events could be poor infrastructure, weather events, a carrier bankruptcy, port labor issues, etc.

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New Executive Order…Will Small Businesses Benefit?

posted by Jennifer Diaz February 13, 2017 0 comments

cui-sealOn January 30th, the Office of the Press Secretary released the Executive Order (EO) on reducing federal regulations and controlling regulatory costs. This latest EO requires that all federal agencies “cut two existing regulations for every new regulation they implement”. According to President Trump, this EO is meant to help small businesses by easing “the opening and expansion of small businesses” and the “incremental costs for the new regulations in 2017 will be zero dollars”. The EO requires “for every one new regulation issued, at least two prior regulations be identified for elimination, and that the cost of planned regulations be prudently managed and controlled through a budgeting process.” There will also be “certain categories of regulations that will be exempt from this new policy, including those dealing with the military and national security”.

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Keep Your Eyes Peeled For The Single Export Licensing System!

posted by Jennifer Diaz February 6, 2017 0 comments

single export licensing picCurrently the U.S. government has three different agencies that have been given the authority to issue export licenses. Those three agencies are: the Departments of Commerce, State, and the Treasury. In 2009, President Obama ordered an interagency review of the current export control system. The review found that the current system was “overly complicated, contained too many redundancies, and, in trying to protect too much, diminished the ability to focus their efforts on the most critical national security priorities”. The review also found that many companies had to apply for multiple export licenses with each of the departments. Due to the findings of the review, the Administration created the Export Control Reform initiative to help establish a single export licensing system.

“The goal of the (ECR) initiative is to create a Single Licensing Agency (SLA), which would act as a ‘one stop shop’ for businesses seeking export license and for the US government to coordinate review of license applications.” The ultimate goal of this new licensing process would be to make the process predictable, timely, and transparent.

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Medical Device Registration Made Easy!

posted by Jennifer Diaz January 27, 2017 1 Comment

Screen Shot 2017-01-26 at 1.40.53 PMThis article is a continuation of: “What Do Dental Floss, Bedpans, and Pacemakers Have in Common?”, and discusses the three types of medical device classifications and how to register and list those devices with the FDA.

FDA’s classes of medical devices:

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established classifications for approximately 1,700 different generic types of medical devices.” The device classification is broken up into three regulatory classes (Class I-III), which is “based on the level of control necessary to assure the safety and effectiveness of the device”. To determine the device classification, the FDA looks at “the intended use of the device and also the indications for use“. According to the FDA’s Guidance on Device Regulation, the intended use of a device “means the general purpose of the device or its function, and encompasses the indications for use”. Indications for use is “a general description of the disease or condition the device will diagnose, treat, prevent, cure, or mitigate, including a description of the patient population for which the device is intended”. (21 C.F.R. §814.20(b)(3)(i)). The class for which your medical device would belong to, determines the type of pre-market submission or application that is required for FDA clearance to sell the medical device in the United States.

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Top Successes of Diaz Trade Law (DTL) & Diaz Trade Consulting (DTC) in 2016!

posted by Jennifer Diaz January 26, 2017 0 comments

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DTL saved clients MILLIONS of dollars in 2016, below we list a summary of some of our compliance successes!

U.S. Customs & Border Protection (CBP)

  • Assisted an importer in having $434,486.00 worth of goods seized returned to it in a RECORD 24 working days, with a signed settlement agreement with CBP in a record 17 working days!
  • Assisted an importer in having $324,466.00 worth of goods seized for an underlying AES violation returned.
  •  Assisted importers in filing prior disclosures that were accepted by CBP, advising of errors found, and avoiding substantial penalties.
  •  Assisted importers in successfully responding to CBP 28’s and 29’s resulting in close outs, and no further enforcement action by CBP!
  •  Assisted importers in creating and maintaining pre-compliance programs to evaluate intellectual property rights and pre-report merchandise to CBP resulting in expedited entry into the U.S. with no delays or examinations by CBP.

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VW to pay HIGHEST CBP PENALTY EVER, $1.45 Billion!

posted by Jennifer Diaz January 19, 2017 0 comments

Screen Shot 2017-01-18 at 11.48.28 AMOn January 11, 2017, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the Attorney General announced the largest criminal and civil settlement ever against Volkswagen (VW) that totaled $4.3 billion. The breakdown of the settlement was $2.8 billion for the criminal penalty and $1.45 billion for a combined civil penalty for both the CBP and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Volkswagen agreed to plead guilty to three felony criminal counts and pay the $2.8 billion dollar penalty. The $1.45 billion combined settlement was for EPA’s “claim for civil penalties against VW in connection with VW’s importation and sale of these cars” as well as CBP’s claim for customs fraud.

CBP’s part of the $1.45 billion settlement dealt with a violation of 19 U.S.C. §1952, which “prohibits persons, by fraud, gross negligence or negligence, from entering or introducing, attempting to introduce, or aiding and abetting the entry or introduction of merchandise into the commerce of the United States, by means of statements or acts that are material and false, or by means of omissions which are material”.

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